News

Dear alumni,

            Welcome to the second installment of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry’s alumni newsletter. Much has transpired in the department since the launching of our inaugural newsletter, and I’m delighted to be able to bring you up to date.   It’s been a great year for us, marked by a strong cadre of 39 baccalaureate, 19 doctoral, and eight master’s degree recipients.  Our faculty corralled an abundance of awards and honors that are detailed below.  The department welcomed a new faculty member, but sadly bid farewell to Fr. Walter.  We were honored to host the family of Nicholas Angelotti (B.S., 1950), as they helped us launch an undergraduate research fund in his name.

            Please know that we here in the department are proud of our alumni and welcome opportunities to learn of your accomplishments. Simply send an email to our assistant chair, Mary Prorok and we will do our best to incorporate items of interest into future newsletters.  In the meantime, I wish you an enjoyable remainder of the summer. Stay cool and stay in touch!

God’s energy yesterday, today and tomorrow: using gravity to power Africa

Author: Grant Johnson

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A common issue with the world of science is how much can we separate science from religion and spirituality. Professor Abigail Mechtenberg of the Department of Physics and the Center for Sustainable Energy, believes that the way we look at spirituality and its relationship to science, affects the solutions we obtain from science. She argues that energy today is based on our social constructs and as a result, we can’t ignore them. Mechtenberg’s own spirituality led her to use her passion for physics to make a positive impact on the world.

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In memoriam: physicist Barry Baumbaugh

Author: Gene Stowe

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Barry Baumbaugh, professional specialist, who joined Notre Dame’s High Energy Physics Group in 1978 as an electrical engineer and played key roles in the design and construction of generations of high-energy experiments, died on Sept. 21. He was 62.

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Jay LaVerne joins U.S. Department of Energy “dream team” to aid in nuclear waste cleanup

Author: Gene Stowe and Tammi Freehling

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ND Energy affiliated faculty member, Jay LaVerne, professional specialist and concurrent professor of radiation physics, has joined a “dream team” of experts to study the chemical reactions that cause nuclear waste to change over time, with the goal of identifying safe, permanent storage for the radioactive material. The nuclear waste is left over from the Manhattan Project, a research and development project that produced the first nuclear weapons during World War II.

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Notre Dame high energy physics group receives $2.77 million NSF grant

Author: Tammi Freehling

High Energy Physics Group: Mitch Wayne, Kevin Lannon, Colin Jessup, Randy Ruchti, And Mike Hildreth

The high energy physics group at Notre Dame recently received a 3-year award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to support their research with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. This new award began September 1, 2016, and will total $2.77 million for three years. The award represents a 15 percent increase over the group’s previous 3-year award of $2.4 million.

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Patricia Curtin White ’80: giving them the world

Author: Chontel Syfox

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While speaking about her most recent trip to Haiti this summer, Dr. Patricia Curtin White ’80 felt a lump in her throat. “What a meaningful week,” she mused, “it’s always hard to leave, and when you do, that week just stays with you.” From June 18 to June 25, Dr. White, a dedicated Haiti Program volunteer, led a team of 20 physicians, nurses, students, and non-medical professionals on a mission trip to Haiti.

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Injuries on the rise among young athletes amid negative youth sports culture

Author: Cliff Djajapranata

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In recent years, overuse injuries have become more common among youth athletes. Along with that trend is a pattern of decreased participation in youth sports. That is all according to Dr. Frederick Azar, who came to speak at the first Dooley Society lecture before the home football game Saturday, Sept. 10.

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