News

The department is delighted to announce the creation of the Nicholas C. Angelotti Undergraduate Research Fund in Analytical Chemistry. The fund, which will provide summer stipends for undergraduate researchers, was formally launched in April with a visit by the family of Nicholas Angelotti.  Included was a lecture by Nicholas’ son, Tim Angelotti, who graduated from Notre Dame in 1985 with a degree in chemistry and is currently an associate professor at the Stanford School of Medicine. The lecture, "Molecular Pharmacology: A biochemical analysis of receptor and ion channel function," described Tim’s work towards defining the molecular basis for receptor specificity with the goal of informing drug design.  Tim’s brother David, a 1985 Notre Dame graduate with a B.S. in engineering, followed the lecture with a few words about his father. Nicholas Angelotti graduated from Notre Dame in 1950 with a bachelor's degree in chemistry, earned a graduate degree at Case Institute of Technology and worked as an analytical chemist for 42 years at Dow Corning Corporation. In addition to Tim and David, Nicholas’ wife Mary Lou, son Steve, and daughter Linda also shared in the day’s events.  Their generosity is most appreciated.  The inaugural recipient of the award is Revathi Kollipara, a senior chemistry major working in the laboratory of Marya Lieberman.

            The department also hosted a gathering of invited chemistry and biochemistry graduate student alumni before the Navy game in late October of 2011.  Fifteen alumni spanning the 1960’s through the 2000’s participated in a pilot focus group for the purpose of identifying ways in which the department can better engage its graduate alumni.  The impetus for this exercise was sourced in the recognition that the graduate experience at Notre Dame differs significantly from the undergraduate one and that graduate alumni probably have stronger ties to their graduating department than do undergraduates, whose allegiance tends to lie with the University as a whole.  Our department was selected for this exploratory study as it boasts one of the largest graduate populations in the University.  Results and a refined model of graduate alumni engagement will be shared with other departments.  If you have thoughts on how the department might better involve it’s former graduate students, please drop a note to Sean Kassen, academic advancement program director for the College of Science.

Research reveals a triple-drug regimen that could eliminate elephantiasis

Author: Gene Stowe

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A collaborative modeling study among three research groups, including Edwin Michael’s laboratory in the Department of Biological Sciences, reveals that a triple-drug regimen could accelerate the elimination of lymphatic filariasis, a mosquito-borne parasitic disease also known as elephantiasis. The study, which shows that the regimen requires far fewer applications than current two-drug combinations, is also significant because it provides a unified scientific consensus on the subject for policymakers who sometimes face a confusing array of separate claims.

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Apply now for the 2017 ND Physics REU program

Author: Shelly Goethals

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The University of Notre Dame’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which celebrated 30 years in 2016, provides opportunities for undergraduate physics majors to experience hands-on participation in research in many areas of physics.

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Researchers publish hypothesis to explain speciation in Rhagoletis flies

Author: Gene Stowe

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Research led by fifth-year graduate student Cheyenne Tait in the Biological Sciences laboratory of Jeffrey L. Feder at Notre Dame has identified structures on the antennae of Rhagoletis flies that could explain why the flies are on their way to diverging into two distinct species even though they are not geographically separated.

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Notre Dame astrophysicist confirms source of galaxy collision

Author: Brian Wallheimer

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Vinicius Placco, a research assistant professor of astrophysics at Notre Dame, collaborated with colleagues at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics to confirm that a massive amount of energy seen 2 billion light years from Earth stems from the collision of two galaxy clusters at the site of a giant black hole.

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Prof. Brian Baker’s lab receives $4 million NIH grant for precision immunotherapy research

Author: Tammi Freehling

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Immunologists are changing how we look at cancer by studying how our immune system plays a role in treating cancer.

Brian Baker, Ph.D. and his lab in the Harper Cancer Research Institute and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry were recently awarded a $4 million, 5-year grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study how they can best engineer a patient’s own T cells in their immune system to target the patient’s specific cancer.

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Interdisciplinary collaboration leads to revised model of brain activity

Author: Tammi Freehling

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Assistant Professor Robert Rosenbaum, in the Department of Applied and Computational Mathematics and Statistics (ACMS), coauthored a paper that was recently published in the journal Nature Neuroscience titled “The spatial structure of correlated neuronal variability.” In the paper, a culmination of research in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh, the scientists propose an extension of "balanced network theory" to explain relationships between the seemingly random activity of neurons in the brain.

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Notre Dame research a “top pick” by Nature Microbiology for Best of 2016

Author: Sarah Craig

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Alex Perkins, PhD, Eck Family Assistant Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, and a member of the Eck Institute for Global Health, is among the “Best of 2016” editor’s top 10 picks for the publication Nature Microbiology, a nature research journal. According to the publication, each year the most popular content is chosen to highlight research that is being viewed, shared, blogged, and picked up by the news.

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