News

The department is delighted to announce the creation of the Nicholas C. Angelotti Undergraduate Research Fund in Analytical Chemistry. The fund, which will provide summer stipends for undergraduate researchers, was formally launched in April with a visit by the family of Nicholas Angelotti.  Included was a lecture by Nicholas’ son, Tim Angelotti, who graduated from Notre Dame in 1985 with a degree in chemistry and is currently an associate professor at the Stanford School of Medicine. The lecture, "Molecular Pharmacology: A biochemical analysis of receptor and ion channel function," described Tim’s work towards defining the molecular basis for receptor specificity with the goal of informing drug design.  Tim’s brother David, a 1985 Notre Dame graduate with a B.S. in engineering, followed the lecture with a few words about his father. Nicholas Angelotti graduated from Notre Dame in 1950 with a bachelor's degree in chemistry, earned a graduate degree at Case Institute of Technology and worked as an analytical chemist for 42 years at Dow Corning Corporation. In addition to Tim and David, Nicholas’ wife Mary Lou, son Steve, and daughter Linda also shared in the day’s events.  Their generosity is most appreciated.  The inaugural recipient of the award is Revathi Kollipara, a senior chemistry major working in the laboratory of Marya Lieberman.

            The department also hosted a gathering of invited chemistry and biochemistry graduate student alumni before the Navy game in late October of 2011.  Fifteen alumni spanning the 1960’s through the 2000’s participated in a pilot focus group for the purpose of identifying ways in which the department can better engage its graduate alumni.  The impetus for this exercise was sourced in the recognition that the graduate experience at Notre Dame differs significantly from the undergraduate one and that graduate alumni probably have stronger ties to their graduating department than do undergraduates, whose allegiance tends to lie with the University as a whole.  Our department was selected for this exploratory study as it boasts one of the largest graduate populations in the University.  Results and a refined model of graduate alumni engagement will be shared with other departments.  If you have thoughts on how the department might better involve it’s former graduate students, please drop a note to Sean Kassen, academic advancement program director for the College of Science.

Astrophysics graduate students witness first-ever detected neutron star collision

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Whitten And Rasmussen 250

Third-year physics graduate students Kaitlin Rasmussen and Devin Whitten were settling into their observation work in August on the 2.5-meter Irénée du Pont Telescope atop a rocky mountain in Las Campanas, Chile, scouring for a type of star enhanced by a set of reactions called the rapid-neutron capture process, or r-process. What they witnessed instead is being described as one of the most significant discoveries in astrophysics.

Read More

Physics professor elected into Academy of Europe

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Michael Wiescher, the Freimann Professor of Nuclear Physics and the director of the Nuclear Science Laboratory, has been elected into the Academia Europaea, the Academy of Europe, for a lifetime of outstanding achievements.

Michael Wiescher

 

Read More

What’s inside the gold that adorns the Golden Dome?

Author: Tammi Freehling

Dvt Studentsonly

During their summer break in 2017, three rising high school seniors prepared to take audiences on a physics journey inside the Golden Dome—modelling what you would see if you could actually view the subatomic particles that comprise a gold molecule. The students—Julianna Meyer of Marian High School in Mishawaka, Ind.; Fiona Hughes of John Adams High School in South Bend, Ind.; and Rose Kelly of St. Joseph High School in South Bend, Ind.—earned a spot presenting to the Live Interactive Planetarium Symposium on July 18, 2017, at Ball State in Muncie, Ind.

Read More

New protein study broadens knowledge of molecular basis for disease

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Patricia Clark 250

Determining how proteins function on a molecular level is crucial to understanding the underlying basis for disease. Now scientists at the University of Notre Dame are one step closer to unraveling the mystery of how intrinsically disordered proteins work, according to new research published in Science.

Read More

Associate dean receives Distinguished Achievement Award from South Bend Alumni Association

Author: Cliff Djajapranata

Margaret 250

Margaret Dobrowolska-Furdyna, the associate dean for undergraduate studies in the College of Science, has won the Distinguished Achievement Award from the South Bend Alumni Association for her role in organizing the Ace for Science tennis tournament. From 2014 through 2016, Dobrowolska-Furdyna organized an annual tennis tournament for charity to raise funds for science programs in local South Bend schools.

Read More

High-Energy Physics Group awarded $1.2 million from DOE

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Mitch Wayne 250

University of Notre Dame physicists and their colleagues have been awarded $1.2 million over four years from the United States Department of Energy to develop radiation-resistant optical devices that can be used in a wide variety of scientific and technical applications, including experiments at the world’s largest particle accelerator, located in Geneva, Switzerland.

Read More