News

The department is delighted to announce the creation of the Nicholas C. Angelotti Undergraduate Research Fund in Analytical Chemistry. The fund, which will provide summer stipends for undergraduate researchers, was formally launched in April with a visit by the family of Nicholas Angelotti.  Included was a lecture by Nicholas’ son, Tim Angelotti, who graduated from Notre Dame in 1985 with a degree in chemistry and is currently an associate professor at the Stanford School of Medicine. The lecture, "Molecular Pharmacology: A biochemical analysis of receptor and ion channel function," described Tim’s work towards defining the molecular basis for receptor specificity with the goal of informing drug design.  Tim’s brother David, a 1985 Notre Dame graduate with a B.S. in engineering, followed the lecture with a few words about his father. Nicholas Angelotti graduated from Notre Dame in 1950 with a bachelor's degree in chemistry, earned a graduate degree at Case Institute of Technology and worked as an analytical chemist for 42 years at Dow Corning Corporation. In addition to Tim and David, Nicholas’ wife Mary Lou, son Steve, and daughter Linda also shared in the day’s events.  Their generosity is most appreciated.  The inaugural recipient of the award is Revathi Kollipara, a senior chemistry major working in the laboratory of Marya Lieberman.

            The department also hosted a gathering of invited chemistry and biochemistry graduate student alumni before the Navy game in late October of 2011.  Fifteen alumni spanning the 1960’s through the 2000’s participated in a pilot focus group for the purpose of identifying ways in which the department can better engage its graduate alumni.  The impetus for this exercise was sourced in the recognition that the graduate experience at Notre Dame differs significantly from the undergraduate one and that graduate alumni probably have stronger ties to their graduating department than do undergraduates, whose allegiance tends to lie with the University as a whole.  Our department was selected for this exploratory study as it boasts one of the largest graduate populations in the University.  Results and a refined model of graduate alumni engagement will be shared with other departments.  If you have thoughts on how the department might better involve it’s former graduate students, please drop a note to Sean Kassen, academic advancement program director for the College of Science.

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Jacek Furdyna 250

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