News

The department is delighted to announce the creation of the Nicholas C. Angelotti Undergraduate Research Fund in Analytical Chemistry. The fund, which will provide summer stipends for undergraduate researchers, was formally launched in April with a visit by the family of Nicholas Angelotti.  Included was a lecture by Nicholas’ son, Tim Angelotti, who graduated from Notre Dame in 1985 with a degree in chemistry and is currently an associate professor at the Stanford School of Medicine. The lecture, "Molecular Pharmacology: A biochemical analysis of receptor and ion channel function," described Tim’s work towards defining the molecular basis for receptor specificity with the goal of informing drug design.  Tim’s brother David, a 1985 Notre Dame graduate with a B.S. in engineering, followed the lecture with a few words about his father. Nicholas Angelotti graduated from Notre Dame in 1950 with a bachelor's degree in chemistry, earned a graduate degree at Case Institute of Technology and worked as an analytical chemist for 42 years at Dow Corning Corporation. In addition to Tim and David, Nicholas’ wife Mary Lou, son Steve, and daughter Linda also shared in the day’s events.  Their generosity is most appreciated.  The inaugural recipient of the award is Revathi Kollipara, a senior chemistry major working in the laboratory of Marya Lieberman.

            The department also hosted a gathering of invited chemistry and biochemistry graduate student alumni before the Navy game in late October of 2011.  Fifteen alumni spanning the 1960’s through the 2000’s participated in a pilot focus group for the purpose of identifying ways in which the department can better engage its graduate alumni.  The impetus for this exercise was sourced in the recognition that the graduate experience at Notre Dame differs significantly from the undergraduate one and that graduate alumni probably have stronger ties to their graduating department than do undergraduates, whose allegiance tends to lie with the University as a whole.  Our department was selected for this exploratory study as it boasts one of the largest graduate populations in the University.  Results and a refined model of graduate alumni engagement will be shared with other departments.  If you have thoughts on how the department might better involve it’s former graduate students, please drop a note to Sean Kassen, academic advancement program director for the College of Science.

Bethlehem Star may not be a star after all

Author: Jessica Sieff

Grantmathews 250

Studying historical, astronomical and biblical records, Grant Mathews believes the event that led the Magi was an extremely rare planetary alignment occurring in 6 B.C., and the likes of which may never be seen again.

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Nicholas Myers takes second place in elevator pitch competition

Author: Chontel Syfox

Nick Myers

Notre Dame doctoral candidate, Nicholas Myers, came second in an elevator pitch contest at the Micronutrient Forum 2016 global conference in Cancun, Mexico. The Micronutrient Forum aims to be a global catalyst and convener for sharing expertise, insights, and experience relevant to micronutrients in all aspects of health promotion and disease prevention. It brings together researchers, professionals, students, organizations, and stakeholders to converse and collaborate in order to end malnutrition worldwide. The particular focus of the 2016 global conference was the positioning of women’s nutrition at the center of sustainable development.

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Why CUSE? - Notre Dame seniors reflect on their experiences with the Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement

Author: Kathleen Schuler

Kiley Emily 250

The Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE) at the University of Notre Dame promotes the intellectual development of Notre Dame undergraduates through scholarly engagement, research, creative endeavors, and the pursuit of fellowships. Although CUSE works with over 1,000 Domers each year, not everyone knows about all of its services. CUSE sat down with four senior CUSE Sorin Scholars — Kiley Adams (biological sciences), Ian Tembe (chemical engineering and philosophy), Grace Watkins (philosophy), and Emily Zion (biochemistry) [pictured in order below] — to speak about the benefits that CUSE has provided for them, and why other students should work with CUSE during their time here.

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Notre Dame’s Grace Watkins and Alexis Doyle named Rhodes Scholars

Author: William G. Gilroy

Doyle Rhodes 250

Watkins, a native of Blacksburg, Virginia, and Doyle, of Los Altos, California, are two of 32 Rhodes Scholars selected from a pool of 882 candidates who had been endorsed by their colleges and universities. They are Notre Dame’s 18th and 19th Rhodes Scholars and will commence their studies at Oxford University in October.

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Eli Lilly faculty fellowship provides drug discovery experience

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Haifenggao 250

Diabetes is a metabolic disease in which the body has an inability to produce enough insulin. In the United States alone, it is estimated that the illness affects nearly 30 million diagnosed and undiagnosed people, and treatment often includes patients using an intravenous or IV method to get insulin into their system. This uncomfortable and inconvenient form of treatment can require anywhere from two to four injections a day, but a Notre Dame researcher is working to combat this problem with a less frequent, oral delivery system.

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Turning ideas into reality for colon cancer research

Author: Jenna Bilinski

Amanda Hummon

Amanda Hummom learned of the strong genetic component behind cancer, especially colon cancer, affecting the same family over and over again. This is a huge part of why she is committed to studying the molecular mechanisms that fuel the disease. “I don’t want to see my children, or my future grandchildren, develop this disease … I want to help all families facing this disease,” she said.

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Illuminating ovarian cancer surgery

Author: Angela Cavalieri

Ovarian Cancer Cells

One in 77 women will develop ovarian cancer in her lifetime.  Because ovarian cancer has no defined symptoms, most women will be diagnosed at a late stage of the disease where metastatic lesions are found dispersed throughout the abdomen. Ovarian cancer is currently the fifth most common cause of cancer-related deaths in women. With new technology being developed at the Harper Cancer Research Institute, the ovarian cancer surgery success rate may ultimately improve significantly.

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