Lecture: Reflections on microscopy & analysis: From viewing the small world to leading on a larger stage


Location: 126 DeBartolo Hall

The Department of Electrical Engineering will host Professor David Williams, dean of Engineering at Ohio State University. Dean Williams is distinguished electron microscopist and materials scientist, co-author of famous text book "Transmission Electron Microscopy: a Textbook for Materials Science" and excellent lecturer. 

Ohio State is recently established an advanced Electron Microscopy Center (https://cemas.osu.edu/content/tem) that has several state-of art electron microscopy equipment including two aberration corrected TEMs with high resolution imaging (below 1 A) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (below 0.3 eV resolution).


It is 150 years since Henry Sorby first viewed an alloy structure under a visible-light microscope and also invented micro-spectroscopy, the first combination of imaging and analytical techniques. I havespent my academic life studying alloys with various microscopy and spectroscopy techniques and recently washonored by the Henry Clifton Sorby Lifetime Achievement Award of the International Metallographic Society (IMS).“Lifetime” is a somewhat sobering adjective, so this timely confluence of anniversaries prompted me to think what I hadlearned in my professional life that might be of use to others, particularly younger academics and researchers early in theircareers. By some standards, I have had a successful career spanning the range from assistant professor to president of a Carnegie Tier-I research university. So, rather than focusing on a historical microscopy talk (which is about all I amqualified to deliver) I will present lessons I have learned in the “bright field” of microscopy/materials research and the“dark field” of university administration and how each side can benefit from the other.