2018 Naughton Fellowship Awardees Announced

Author: Joanne Fahey

Twenty-six students have been announced as awardees of the Naughton Fellowships for 2018. The research fellowships were awarded to undergraduate, Masters, and Ph.D. students from the University of Notre Dame and from four universities in Ireland. This year’s winners from Notre Dame represent three Notre Dame Colleges and Schools, including the Colleges of Arts and Letters, Engineering, and Science.

 

Speaking about this year’s awardees, Brian Baker, Rev. John A. Zahm Professor of Structural Biology and director of the Naughton Fellowships, said, “The newest Naughton Fellows represent all that the Naughton Fellowship stands for – exceptional scholarship, an ambassadorial spirit, and a commitment to the advancement of STEM research both in the U.S. and in Ireland. I am delighted to welcome these new students to our community and congratulate them on their achievements thus far.” Baker continued, “Further, I would like to thank the Naughton Family for their continual support of this program. It is because of their vision – and their dedication – that the Fellowships, and these students, continue to flourish.”

 

The 2018 Naughton Fellowship awardees are as follows:

 

PhD

Kelvin M. Figueroa-Ibrahim, a Ph.D. student in aerospace and mechanical engineering at the University of Notre Dame, and Eoghan Ross, a Ph.D. student in mechanical and manufacturing engineering at Trinity College Dublin, will work on a project entitled “Dark-MetaLiner,” which proposes a disruptive sub-wavelength, sound-absorbing material to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft on communities located in the vicinity of airports.

 

Masters

Ashley Ahimbisibwe, a statistics major at the University of Notre Dame, will undertake a Masters of Science in statistics at University College Dublin.

 

Sarah Cate Baker, a biological sciences and English major at the University of Notre Dame, will complete her Masters of Science in global health from Trinity College Dublin.

 

David Gormley, who has a bachelors degree in electronic and electrical engineering, and is currently undertaking a masters in engineering in electronic and computer engineering, at University College Dublin will complete the Engineering, Science, and Technology Entrepreneurship Excellence Masters (ESTEEM) program at the University of Notre Dame.

 

Darragh Meaney, a business information systems major from University College Cork, will complete the ESTEEM program at the University of Notre Dame.

 

Odhran Reidy, an electronic and electrical engineering major from University College Cork, will complete the ESTEEM program at the University of Notre Dame.

 

Sam O’Melveny, a civil engineering major at the University of Notre Dame, will pursue a Masters of Science in structural and geotechnical engineering at Trinity College Dublin.

 

Morgan Paladino, a neuroscience and behavior major at the University of Notre Dame, will undertake a Masters of Science in neuroscience at Trinity College Dublin.

 

Paul Shanahan, who has a bachelors in computer engineering and is currently undertaking a masters of computer engineering, both from Trinity College Dublin, will complete the ESTEEM program at the University of Notre Dame.

 

Peadar Timmins, a biomedical engineering major from University College Dublin, will complete the ESTEEM program at the University of Notre Dame.

 

Undergraduate

 

Emily Abramczyk, a science pre-professional major at the University of Notre Dame, will complete undergraduate research in bioengineering at Trinity College Dublin.

 

Amanda Addiego, a biology major at the University of Notre Dame, will undertake her undergraduate research in biomolecular and biomedical science at University College Dublin.

 

Luis Alberto Cañizares, a physics and astronomy student at Dublin City University, will undertake his research experience in physics at the University of Notre Dame.

 

Leigh Campbell, a science computing student at the University of Notre Dame, will complete research in bioinformatics at Dublin City University.

 

Michael Canonico, a chemical engineering major at the University of Notre Dame, will undertake research in organic chemistry at Trinity College Dublin.

 

Kiana Caranto, a chemical engineering major at the University of Notre Dame, will research medical device design at University College Dublin.

 

Eimear Conroy, a University College Dublin student in physics, will complete undergraduate research in nuclear physics at the University of Notre Dame.

 

Alfredo Duarte, an aerospace and mechanical engineering major at the University of Notre Dame, will undertake research in mechanical and manufacturing engineering at Trinity College Dublin.

 

John Fehilly, a University College Cork genetics student, will undertake biology research at the University of Notre Dame.

 

Margueritta Goulden, an astrophysics student at Trinity College Dublin, will complete research in biology and physics at the University of Notre Dame.

 

Allison Huffman, a neuroscience and behavior major at the University of Notre Dame, will complete research on neuroscience at Trinity College Dublin.

 

Paula Murphy, a mechanical and manufacturing engineering student at Trinity College Dublin, will complete research in engineering at the University of Notre Dame.

 

Robert Power, a University College Cork physics student, will study physics as part of his undergraduate research at the University of Notre Dame.

 

Muireann Spain, a mechanical engineering student at University College Dublin, will undertake bioengineering research at the University of Notre Dame.

 

Ciara Walsh, a Dublin City University genetics and cell biology student, will complete undergraduate research in biology at the University of Notre Dame.

 

Additionally, one Clark Fellowship was awarded to Bailey Jaeger, a neuroscience and behavior major from the University of Notre Dame, who will undertake her undergraduate research experience in neuroimaging at Trinity College Dublin.

 

Finally, in consideration of the year’s activities, Baker thanked the Naughton Fellowship Committee members, stating, “Each year, our committee devotes many hours to making this program a success. I’d like to thank each of them for their time, commitment, and insights, but I’d like to especially thank Steven Corcelli, professor of chemistry and biochemistry, who volunteered his time to serve our future Naughton Fellows as an interviewer for the Masters Award. He provided invaluable assistance in selecting our new Fellows.”

 

The Naughton Fellowship program allows students with a background in, or aptitude for, STEM fields to experience international research and educational opportunities through a funded exchange program involving the University of Notre Dame and some of Ireland’s leading research universities. Irish undergraduates, Masters students, and Ph.D. candidates can come to Notre Dame on the fellowship, while Notre Dame undergraduates, Masters students, and Ph.D. candidates can travel to Ireland to study and complete research.

 

For more information, including how to apply, please see naughton.nd.edu.

Originally published by Joanne Fahey at naughton.nd.edu on May 08, 2018.