Event to focus on cancer research

Author: Gail Hinchion Mancini


Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI Research Day Monday, April 23 will gather cancer researchers from the University of Notre Dame and Indiana University School of Medicine-South Bend (IUSM-SB) in an afternoon of exchange and discussion. A keynote address by Beatrice Knudsen, M.D., Ph.D., will discuss “Tissue Banking for Genomic Research and Personalized Medicine.

Knudsen is the Medical Director for Cedars-Sinai Advanced Biobank and Director of Translational Pathology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and a member of the HCRI external advisory committee. Her presentation is free and open to the public.

All events for Research Day will take place in Raclin-Carmichael and Harper Halls at IUSM-SB where the cancer research institute is headquartered. Notre Dame and IUSM-SB faculty and research staff who are currently engaged in cancer research or who are interested in forming cancer-related research partnerships are encouraged to attend. Undergraduate, graduate and medical students and post-doctoral fellows and staff also are welcome.

Activities planned for the afternoon include:

  • A display and judging of student and post-doctoral fellow posters, 1:15 to 2:45, Harper Hall

  • Welcome and presentations by recipients of Walther Advancing Basic Cancer Research Grants funding; 3 to 4 p.m., Raclin-Carmichael Auditorium             

  • Knudsen address and Poster Contest Awards, 4 to 5 p.m., Raclin-Carmichael Auditorium

  • Reception, 5 to 6 p.m., Raclin-Carmichael Atrium

The poster contest will display the work of undergraduate and graduate students and post-doctoral fellows engaged in cancer research in Notre Dame and IUSM-SB laboratories.

HCRI, a joint partnership between IUSM-SB and Notre Dame, was inaugurated March 8, 2011 with the opening of Harper Hall. The Institute serves as the locus of cancer research activity for IUSM-SB, Notre Dame, and the regional medical community with efforts that promise to quicken the pace at which new treatments and diagnostics are discovered, developed, tested in clinical trials, and ultimately used to improve and save lives.

Originally published by Gail Mancini at harpercancer.nd.edu on March 29, 2012.