News » Archives » 2009

Instrumentation Funding for Biomolecular Interactions

Author: Gene Stowe

NIH

 

Funding from the National Institutes of Health was awarded for the purchase of an ultrasensitive microcalorimeter for the study of biomolecular interactions.

The instrument, a Microcal ITC200, tracks the heat released when two molecules interact, allowing determination of a complete thermodynamic profile for the interaction. The ITC200 is specifically optimized for the study of interactions between  biological molecules and compounds such as small molecule drug candidates or other proteins. The instrument will impact ongoing studies on the functioning of the immune system, cell signaling, and development of drugs for stroke, cancer, and bacterial infections. Major participants in the proposal were Brian M. Baker, Shahriar Mobashery, Frank Castellino, Rob Stahelin, and Jeffrey Peng.…

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Chief Scientific Officer Schadt Speaks on Integrative Biology

Author: Gene Stowe

Eric Schadt, the chief scientific officer at Pacific Biosciences and founder of SAGE Bionetworks, in a lecture on the emerging field of systems biology on Nov. 24, proposed a broad approach that takes into account the complexity of living organisms. The lecture in the Jordan Hall of Science titled: “An integrative biology approach to reverse engineering living systems,” showed the limits of more narrowly focused approaches in a field that has application to disease treatment and drug discovery, renewable energy, and adequate food production. Michael Ferdig, professor of Biological Sciences, arranged the visit.…

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Eskildsen Honored at Irish Hockey Game

Author: Marissa Gebhard

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Morten Eskildsen, associate professor of physics, was chosen to be honored on “Favorite Professor Day” at the Irish hockey game on November 15 against Northern Michigan.

Eskildsen was selected by senior goaltender Tommy O'Brien who has taken Quantum Mechanics I and II, and Introduction to Mechanics I and II from Eskildsen. O’Brien said, "Not only was quantum my favorite class, but I'm also interested in his superconductor research and am currently doing research in his lab."…

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Eskildsen Honored at Irish Hockey Game

Author: Marissa Gebhard

eskildsen

Morten Eskildsen, associate professor of physics, was chosen to be honored on “Favorite Professor Day” at the Irish hockey game on November 15 against Northern Michigan.

Eskildsen was selected by senior goaltender Tommy O'Brien who has taken Quantum Mechanics I and II, and Introduction to Mechanics I and II from Eskildsen. O’Brien said, "Not only was quantum my favorite class, but I'm also interested in his superconductor research and am currently doing research in his lab."…

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College of Science programs find opportunities in laboratories for undergrads

Author: Gene Stowe

Undergraduate research

Undergraduate research, a longstanding natural element of a College of Science education at the University of Notre Dame, has accelerated in recent years with an increased commitment to make such opportunities available in a systematic way.

New and expanded programs, both during the academic year and during the summer, are bringing more students into research, with the goal that any science student who wants them can have access to research opportunities.

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Notre Dame to unveil multi-wavelength NASA images

Author: Marissa Runkle

NASA mural (2009)

In commemoration of the International Year of Astronomy, the University of Notre Dame will unveil new mural-sized images from NASA’s great observatories Thursday (Nov. 19) during two shows in the Digital Visualization Theater in the Jordan Hall of Science.

The shows, which are free and open to the public, will begin at 7 and 8 p.m. Free tickets, which are required for the show, are available at the LaFortune Student Center box office.

The Digital Visualization Theater will take viewers on a journey to the center of our galaxy and unveil unprecedented mural-sized images of the Milky Way’s core as seen by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory.

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Notre Dame’s Neal being briefed on water findings from lunar-impact mission

Author: William G. Gilroy

Clive Neal

NASA announced Nov. 13 that its LCROSS lunar-impact probe mission found significant quantities of water in the plume of material the crash produced.

“We are ecstatic,” said Anthony Colaprete, project scientist for the LCROSS, a sentiment which is shared by Clive Neal, professor of civil engineering and geological sciences at the University of Notre Dame and a leading planetary geologist.

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New paper describes connections between Circadian and metabolic systems

Author: William G. Gilroy

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A paper by University of Notre Dame biologist Giles Duffield and a team of researchers offers new insights into a gene that plays a key role in modulating the body’s Circadian system and may also simultaneously modulate its metabolic system.

The relationship between circadian and metabolic systems the researchers describe could have important implications for understanding the higher incidence of cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes among shift workers.

 

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Siemens Regional Competition scheduled for Nov. 13 and 14 at Notre Dame

Author: William G. Gilroy

Seimens

Five individuals and five teams of high school students have been selected to compete Friday and Saturday (Nov. 13 and 14) at the University of Notre Dame in the regional round of the Siemens Competition in Math, Science and Technology, the nation’s premier science research competition for high school students.

The New Jersey-based non-profit Siemens Foundation created the competition to enhance science and mathematics education in America. It is open to individuals and teams of high school students who develop independent research projects in the physical or biological sciences or mathematics.

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Thomas Catanach Receives American Physical Society Scholarship

Author: Gene Stowe

tcantanach

Sophomore physics and classical languages major Thomas Catanach has received a Minorities in Physics scholarship from the American Physical Society. This scholarship is aimed at fostering continued education in physics and undergraduate research. Catanach’s application included significant research he performed as a Notre Dame freshman in Project GRAND, Gamma Ray Astrophysics at Notre Dame, led by Physics professor John Poirier.…

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Research with a vision

Author: Gene Stowe

David Hyde

To the naked eye, humans may not appear to have much in common with the zebrafish, a small tropical freshwater species belonging to the minnow family.

But a Notre Dame biologist is taking a much closer look at the two species and finding potential for treating a number of diseases and conditions.

 

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New Notre Dame study provides insights into the molecular basis of tumor cell behavior

Author: William G. Gilroy

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A new study by a team of researchers led by Crislyn D’Souza-Schorey, associate professor of biological sciences at the University of Notre Dame, sheds light on the molecular basis by which tumor cells modulate their surroundings to favor cancer progression.

The study elucidates mechanisms involved in the release of microvesicles –small membrane enclosed sacs – from tumor cells that facilitate creation of paths of least resistance allowing tumor cells to migrate. The research offers new insights into how tumor cells invade their surrounding environment and may eventually lead to improved methods for measuring the progression of cancers.…

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Bunker Elected Vice Chair of International X-ray Absorption Society

Author: Gene Stowe

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Bruce A. Bunker, professor of physics, has been elected Vice Chair and Chair Elect of the International X-ray Absorption Society, an international group with some 800 members including 200 in the United States. Bunker is director of the Materials Research Collaborative Access Team, a consortium that develops and uses x-ray beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago, one of the three most sophisticated x-ray synchrotron sources in the world.…

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Malaria Research Earns Conference Award for Graduate Student

Author: Gene Stowe

m_wacker

Mark Wacker, a fourth-year graduate student in the Eck Institute for Global Health, has won an award for Best Young Investigator Presentation at the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Conference in Washington, D.C. Wacker, who is also a trainee on an NIH Chemistry Biochemistry Biology Interface (CBBI) training grant, is advised by Michael Ferdig. His research suggests the function of one of the main genes in a malarial parasite involved in the parasite’s drug resistance.…

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Children experience chemistry first-hand during National Chemistry Week

Author: Gene Stowe

chemweek1

Graduate, undergraduate students and professional specialist faculty in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry provided vivid demonstrations and hands-on experiments on Saturday, October 24 in celebration of National Chemistry Week. The inaugural event, held in the Jordan Hall of Science Galleria, attracted a steady stream of visitors before the Notre Dame-Boston College football game. Exploding balloons, bright-colored flame tests, and green-burning boric acid drawings of shamrocks and the ND monogram acquainted people with an elementary understanding of science.

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Mary Prorok Appointed Assistant Chair in Chemistry and Biochemistry

Author: Marissa Gebhard

mary_prorok

Mary Prorock, research associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, has been named assistant chair of the department. The new Assistant Chair position is designed to promote the research mission of the department by leading the preparation and submission of programmatic grant applications for federal and foundation awards, multi-PI proposals, instrumentation grants, and other department programmatic awards. The assistant chair will also serve as a liaison with University research centers, and lead special projects in the department. 

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NDeRC and I2U2 Conduct Workshop to Train Teachers

Author: Gene Stowe

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The Notre Dame extended Research Community (NDeRC) and Interactions in Understanding the Universe (I2U2@Notre Dame) hosted a National Science Foundation-sponsored workshop on August 10 and 11 in Jordan Hall. The workshop brought local middle and high school teachers together to study data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in Washington State and to learn how to use online e-Labs in their classrooms.

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Himonas Receives Outstanding Mathematics Alumnus Award from Purdue University

Author: Marissa Gebhard

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Each fall, the Purdue University Department of Mathematics and College of Science recognize outstanding Purdue alumni. Alex Himonas, Professor of Mathematics at the University of Notre Dame, is the 2009 Outstanding Mathematics Alumnus.

Himonas received his Ph.D. in Mathematics in 1985 under the direction of Salah Baouendi. Himonas is interested in the regularity of solutions to linear partial differential equations (PDE), and in the Cauchy problem for nonlinear evolution equations. His earlier work concentrated on the microlocal analytic regularity of the solutions to principal type PDE with analytic coefficients. More recently, he is working on the regularity theory (analytic, smooth) for degenerate elliptic PDE, in particular PDE that are sums of squares of vector fields. In non-linear PDE, he is working on the well-posedness of the initial value problem for evolution equations.

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Howk Appointed to Large Binocular Telescope Committee

Author: Marissa Gebhard

chris_howk_web

Assistant Professor of Physics Jay Christopher Howk has been appointed to the Science and Technology Advisory Committee (STC) for the Large Binocular Telescope Project (LBT). The LBT is a $200 million telescope in southern Arizona, and the largest telescope on a single mount in the world. The LBT project is an international collaboration between Germany, Italy, University of Arizona, The Ohio State University, University of Notre Dame and other US institutions.…

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Taylor Receives International Research Collaboration Grant from NSF and DFG

Author: Marissa Gebhard

taylor_assocdean

The National Science Foundation (NSF) and its German counterpart, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), have awarded a multidisciplinary collaborative research grant to the University of Notre Dame and German research partners. With this award, the Organic and Macromolecular Chemistry Program of the NSF is supporting the research of Richard Taylor, professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry and associate dean for research in the College of Science.…

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Hahn Appointed to University of Vienna Advisory Board

Author: Marissa Gebhard

hahn

Alexander Hahn, a professor of mathematics who recently ended a seven-year term as director of the Kaneb Center for Teaching and Learning, has been appointed to the Advisory Board of the Center for Teaching and Learning of the University of Vienna.

Hahn says that European universities are currently engaged in a wide ranging restructuring of their entire approach to higher education within the so-called Bologna Process. It is the two-fold aim of these reforms to create compatible and continent-wide curricula, credit hour systems, and degree programs and at the same time to promote student centered, technology enhanced instruction. The CTL Vienna is charged by the president of the university to lead this effort at the University of Vienna.…

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Wiescher Discusses Advances in Measuring Nuclear Reactions

Author: Gene Stowe

wiescher

A paper by Michael Wiescher published in the American Physical Society’s Physics journal recently traces development in research on nuclear reactions that happen in stars. The article titled “Cosmic alchemy in the laboratory” covers both theoretical and experimental advances in the field, as well as a discussion of the role of such reactions in creating the variety of physical elements. Wiescher is the Freimann Chair of Physics, Director of the Nuclear Science Laboratory and Director of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics.

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Graduate students receive genomics and bioinformatics fellowship awards

Author: Gene Stowe

The Genomics, Disease Ecology and Global Health Strategic Research Initiative Program and the Eck Institute for Global Health are pleased to announce the awarding of five graduate student fellowships in the areas of genomics and bioinformatics. These are one-year awards that will allow graduate students in the College of Science and the College of Engineering to pursue graduate research program

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Artist’s Work at the Intersection of Art and Life Sciences

Author: Gene Stowe

 

The remarkable artwork of Patricia Olynyk will be on display in the Jordan Hall of Science from Aug. 28–Sept. 25. Olynyk, director of the graduate school of art at Washington University in Saint Louis, creates large installations that combine her photographs of sense organs, taken with an electron micrograph, with her photographs of Japanese gardens designed to excite the senses. The displays include sounds recorded at the gardens. Olynyk will give a lecture in Jordan Hall on Thursday, Sept. 10.…

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Six Faculty Receive Genomics and Bioinformatics Pilot Project Awards

Author: Katherine Taylor

The Genomics, Disease Ecology and Global Health Strategic Research Initiative Program and the Eck Institute for Global Health have announced the presentation of six awards to support pilot projects in the areas of genomics and bioinformatics. This announcement comes at a time in which Notre Dame has recently funded the expansion of core facilities in genomics and bioinformatics. The goal of this investment is to provide university-wide access to technical and computational resources for high throughput, computationally intensive genomics and bioinformatics projects, as well as to recruit new scientific users to these powerful technologies. In support of this goal, applications for pilot project funds to support scientist from across campus for whom genomics and/or bioinformatics could be important to their research were solicited and reviewed. Projects were selected based on scientific significance and rationale, approach, preliminary data, need for support and the potential to leverage additional extramural funding.…

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Hartland Appointed to Senior Editor of Journal of Physical Chemistry

Author: Gene Stowe

greg_hartland

Greg Hartland, professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, was appointed senior editor of The Journal of Physical Chemistry beginning Aug. 1. The appointment is for two years. The journal, with separate weekly issues on dynamics and spectroscopy, soft matter and biophysics, and nanomaterials and interfaces, is the premier journal for publishing research in physical chemistry. It accounts for more than 20 percent of all articles published in American Chemical Society journals.…

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Furdyna Awarded Copernicus Medal by Polish Academy of Sciences

Author: Marissa Gebhard

jacekfurdyna

In a ceremony on July 3, 2009 held in Warsaw, Professor of Physics Jacek Furdyna was awarded the Nicolaus Copernicus Medal by the Polish Academy of Sciences. The medal is the Academy’s highest honor. Among its past recipients are renowned scientists and engineers in the fields of biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, computer science, engineering, and other areas of science and technology, including a number of Nobel Prize winners, whose work in the opinion of the Polish Academy of Sciences has had significant impact on science and technology in Poland. …

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Middle School Students Present Science at Sensing Our World Program 2009

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Sensing Our World 2009

Middle school students at Sensing our World Go GreeND, a longstanding summer program at Notre Dame with an environmental emphasis this year, learned about ecologically sound approaches to urban space, the physics of energy, how chemists are developing biodegradable alternatives to various consumer goods, environmental philosophy and ecological adaptation. Teams of students demonstrated their projects in the Jordan Hall Galleria at the end of the camp in July.…

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High School Students Experience Modern Science and Nuclear Physics

Author: Gene Stowe

Last week, a dozen students from South Bend area high schools participated in the fourth annual PIXE-PAN, a weeklong program for students and teachers interested in exploring topics in modern science, nuclear physics, and nuclear astrophysics. Teachers came from as far away as Georgia and Texas. Senior faculty and staff of the Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics (ISNAP) lectured and led hands-on experiments.

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New study describes risk of mobile phone virus attacks

Author: Marissa Gebhard

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Traditional cell phones have been immune to viruses because they lack standardized operating systems. However, as smart phones rapidly increase in market share, viruses pose a serious threat to mobile communications.

A new study in the journal Science that is coauthored by University of Notre Dame physics doctoral student Pu Wang and researchers from Northeastern University suggests that the risk of mobile phone virus attacks will increase as a few operating systems gain more market share. The study also analyzes the pattern and speed of the spread of infection for Bluetooth and multimedia messaging services (MMS). The researchers used anonymous billing records of 6.2 million mobile subscribers and tracked calling patterns using the location of the closest mobile phone tower.…

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