News » Archives » October 2010

Physics Faculty Receive DOE Award to Study Nuclear Properties

Author: Shelly Goethals

Professors of physics Grant Mathews, Stefan Frauendorf, and Mark Caprio have received a 3-year Department of Energy award, totaling $570,000 for their research on "Nuclear Properties at Extreme Density, Temperature, Spin, and Isospin".

This proposal involves theoretical investigations which will reveal the properties of nuclear matter and individual nuclei in both astrophysical and laboratory environments with extreme temperature, density, angular momentum, or large excesses of neutrons or protons. The astrophysical investigations include the development of computer models for hot big bang, the formation of galaxies, the deep interiors of massive stars, the explosions of stars in supernovae, and the high-density environments around neutron stars and black holes. The nuclear studies will explore the collective and quantum many-body structure of exotic atomic nuclei. These studies will help to clarify the origin and evolution of the universe and the elements, along with pointing the way to new experiments for the next generation of nuclear heavy-ion accelerators that seek to find new exotic isotopes and new forms of nuclear matter.physics_professors_doe2010

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Physics Graduate Students Win India- U.S. Travel Awards

Author: Gene Stowe

Two of the six travel award winners in this year’s India-U.S. Physics Students Visitation Program were graduate students in Physics at Notre Dame. Akaa Daniel Ayangeakaa and James Matta, both advised by Umesh Garg, participated in the program co-sponsored by the Indo-U.S. Science and Technology Forum (IUSSTF) and the American Physical Society (APS).…

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Physicists Receive $600K NSF Award for Advancing Research in Semiconductors

Author: Gene Stowe

Physicists, Margaret Dobrowolska, Jacek Furdyna and Xinyu Liu, have just been awarded a 4-year grant of $600,000 by the National Science Foundation for work titled, “Electron Spin Effects in Semiconductor Nanostructures” which will ultimately aid in increasing the functionality of electronic microchip devices.…

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Notre Dame Recognizes its heroes of Haiti

Author: Angela Sienko

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During the Notre Dame-Pittsburgh football game on Saturday, October 9, the University recognized a special group of alumni and staff who represented the large Notre Dame contingent who helped with the recovery efforts after the January earthquake in Haiti.

Léogâne, the city hit hardest by the quake, is home to the Notre Dame Haiti Program, which was founded by Rev. Thomas Streit, C.S.C., a professor of biological sciences, to eradicate lymphatic filariasis. Also volunteering in Léogâne are members of Emil’s Army, medical professionals who are former chemistry students of Professor Emeritus Emil T. Hofman.

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Furdyna Invited to Join Ukrainian Journal of Physics International Advisory Board

Author: Marissa Gebhard

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Jacek Furdyna, who holds the Marquez Chair of Information Theory and Computer Technology in the Department of Physics, has been invited to join the International Advisory Board of the Ukrainian Journal of Physics.

Furdyna, a Fellow of both the American Physical Society and the United Kingdom’s Institute of Physics, has co-authored over 700 publications and given talks across the United States as well as in Poland, Korea, Germany, Austria, Canada, Belgium, Japan, France, Georgia and Russia. Furdyna, a native of Poland who earned his bachelor’s degree at Loyola University in Chicago and his Ph.D. at Northwestern University, came to Notre Dame in 1987.…

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Eskildsen Receives DOE Award

Author: Marissa Gebhard

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Morten Ring Eskildsen, associate professor of physics, has been awarded a new, 3-year DOE award of $519,013 for his project, "Metastable Vortex Lattices – Properties and Applications."

The collective nature of the correlated electron many-body system in the presence of magnetic fields and/or localized magnetic moments displays an astonishing variety of different phenomena. Among these one finds magnetic ordering, superconductivity, fractionally charged excitations, quantum criticality and non-Fermi liquid behavior to name just a few. One of the current grand challenges in solid state physics is to provide a microscopic understanding of superconductivity in systems where it coexists with local magnetic moments, relevant for high-Tc as well as heavy-fermion superconductors.…

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Kolda Uses Large Hadron Collider Results in HEP Research

Author: Marissa Gebhard

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Christopher Kolda, associate professor of physics, has just received a new, 3-year NSF award in support of his research in theoretical high energy physics (HEP). Kolda has been funded to study the physics of electroweak symmetry breaking using forthcoming results from the Large Hadron Collider, specifically the twin theoretical ideas of the Higgs mechanism and supersymmetry. By examining extensions of the Higgs sector, he and his students will be working to test, and distinguish among, the minimal models of supersymmetry.…

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