News » Archives » March 2012

New finding affects understanding of formation of the solar system

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Mini planetary system

A global collaboration including five University of Notre Dame researchers has revised the half-life of samarium-146 (146Sm), reducing it to 68 million years from 103 million years. The finding is published in the journal Science.

The revised half-life, which is 34 percent shorter than the previously adopted value, affects the understanding of processes leading to the formation of the solar system, and dating of some major geological events in the mantles of Earth and other terrestrial planets in the early solar system.

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Senior biochemistry major publishes findings which could improve fuel cell efficiency

Author: Marissa Gebhard

jason_kopec

Jason Kopec, a senior biochemistry major, has published a paper in the journal Inorganic Chemistry detailing research conducted in the laboratory of Seth Brown, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry. Kopec is first author on the paper, Molybdenum(VI) Complexes of a 2,2'-Biphenyl-bridged Bis(amidophenoxide): Competition Between Metal-Ligand and Metal-Amidophenoxide π Bonding; the other authors are Sukesh Shekar and Brown.

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Research shows invasive species cost the Great Lakes millions

Author: William G. Gilroy

David Lodge

A new paper by researchers from the University of Notre Dame, the University of Wyoming and the Technical University of Delft in the Netherlands assigns a dollar figure on the cost to the Great Lakes from invasive species that originate in the ballast water of ocean-going vessels.

David M. Lodge and John D. Rothlisberger of Notre Dame, David C. Finnoff of Wyoming, and Roger M. Cooke of Delft determined that the median estimate of damages is $138 million annually but could be more than $800 million annually.

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NSF-funded nuclear accelerator goes live

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Nuclear Accelerator

The first new accelerator for low-energy nuclear physics in the United States since the 1980s was recently installed at Notre Dame. The $3.5 million project includes a 10–ton tank installed vertically in the center of Nieuwland Science Hall and will provide beams to the newly–designed St. George Recoil Separator at Notre Dame.

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The first few hundred million years of the Solar System

Author: Yoav Kashiv, University of Notre Dame and Michael Paul, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

solar_system_fig1_03_29_2012_

Establishing chronologies of past events or determining ages of objects require having clocks that tick at different paces, according to how far back one looks. Nuclear clocks, used for this dating, are based on the rate of decay of an atomic nucleus expressed by a half-life, the time it takes for half of a number of nuclei to decay which is a property of each nuclear species.

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Event to focus on cancer research

Author: Gail Hinchion Mancini

beatrice_knudsen

Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI) Research Day Monday, April 23 will gather cancer researchers from the University of Notre Dame and Indiana University School of Medicine-South Bend (IUSM-SB) in an afternoon of exchange and discussion. A keynote address by Beatrice Knudsen, M.D., Ph.D., will discuss “Tissue Banking for Genomic Research and Personalized Medicine.”

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What's the big idea? Ten speakers to participate in ND Thinks Big

Author:

ND Thinks Big

ND Thinks Big, a student-organized event modeled after TED talks and Harvard Thinks Big, will take place at 7 p.m. March 22 (Thursday) in the Jordan Auditorium of the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business.

Sponsored by student forum The Hub and the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement, the event features 10 speakers from the Notre Dame faculty and administration, who will each deliver a 10-minute talk about their research and current work within their respective fields.

The speakers, nine professors and one administrator, were chosen by the students specifically for their work.

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New paper examines poison resistance in snakes around the world

Author: William G. Gilroy

T. Sirtalis

A new study by University of Notre Dame biologist Michael Pfrender and a team of researchers from the University of Nevada, Reno; Utah State University; and the University of Virginia suggests that snakes from different regions of the world have evolved a similar, remarkable resistance to a deadly neurotoxin.

The finding, which appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, greatly increases scientists’ understanding of the genetic basis of adaptation and is a model for understanding the limits to adaptation and the degree to which evolutionary responses are predictable.

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Land Institute president to deliver sustainability lecture at Notre Dame

Author: William G. Gilroy

Wes Jackson

Wes Jackson, president of the Land Institute, will be the inaugural Lecturer in Sustainability at 7 p.m. on March 28 (Wednesday) in Room 101 of the Jordan Hall of Science at the University of Notre Dame.

His lecture, titled “Why Agriculture Must Take the Lead Toward a Sustainable Future,” is free and open to the public.

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Solar storm's effects measured

Author: Shelly Goethals

John Poirier

An array of detectors at the University of Notre Dame recorded the expected cosmic reaction to the solar storm earlier this week, an event that actually deflects certain outer-space particles from reaching the Earth. John Poirier, a professor emeritus of astrophysics and elementary particle physics, said measurements after the relatively weak solar storm showed a dip in the number of muons, which are produced when protons hit the upper atmosphere.

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Golfers support NPC research through Parseghian Classic at Pebble Beach Resorts

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Pebble Beach Golf Links

Golfers are teaming with the Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation and the University of Notre Dame to find a treatment or cure for Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease, a rare and fatal neurodegenerative disease that primarily strikes children before and during adolescence. Proceeds raised from the Parseghian Classic golf fundraiser at Pebble Beach Resorts on June 22-24 will fund NPC research at Notre Dame and other institutions.

“Notre Dame researchers are at the forefront of NPC research and their advances in the understanding of this disease give hope to all NPC children and their families,” says Cindy Parseghian, who co-founded the Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation just two months after three of her four children were diagnosed with NPC.

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Trozzolo receives 2012 University of Chicago Professional Achievement Award

Author: Marissa Gebhard

tony_trozzolo

Anthony M. Trozzolo, the Charles L. Huisking Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, has received a 2012 University of Chicago Professional Achievement Award from the Alumni Board of Governors. Trozzolo earned a master's degree in chemistry in 1957 and a Ph.D. in chemistry in 1960, both from the University of Chicago. He worked at Bell Laboratories before he came to Notre Dame in 1975. Trozzolo, a pioneer in photochemistry, has delivered more than 300 invited lectures, published more than 90 articles and received 31 U. S. and foreign patents. He was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Institute of Chemists in 1963, and he organized and chaired the first Gordon Research Conference on Organic Photochemistry in 1964.

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Eskildsen research group reports results of their latest small-angle neutron scattering studies

Author: Shelly Goethals

Eskildsen

In a recent paper published in Physical Review Letters, Notre Dame graduate student Pinaki Das and Associate Professor Morten Ring Eskildsen report results of their latest small-angle neutron scattering studies of the vortex lattice studies in the heavy fermion superconductor CeCoIn5. In particular they investigated the detailed interplay between superconductivity and magnetism in this material, which show very strong Pauli paramagnetic effects on the vortex cores.

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Bengal Bouts participants aid in concussion research

Author: William G. Gilroy

82nd Annual Bengal Bouts

The University of Notre Dame’s annual Bengal Bouts student boxing tournament’s longtime mantra is “Strong bodies fight, that weak bodies may be nourished.”

The unusual mantra is fitting for an unusual competition whose ticket sale proceeds benefit Holy Cross Missions in Bangladesh, part of the ministry of the Congregation of Holy Cross, Notre Dame’s founding religious community.

However, this year a large number of Bengal Bouts boxers are going even further to do good by volunteering to participate in post-bout concussion testing.

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Dorm energy competition: May the best quad win

Author: Rachel Novick

Quad Energy Competition

At this time of year, you might expect Notre Dame students to be focusing on midterms or planning for spring break. But instead, students across campus are getting ready for a new kind of dorm energy competition.

New state-of-the-art meters and a new online dashboard will now enable students to see how much energy their dorm is using and how they rank in the competition at any time. The dashboard engages students not just by providing regularly updated data, but also by giving students a social media-based forum to commit to energy-saving behaviors and share winning strategies.

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Team of scientists wins grant to research tuberculosis diagnostics

Author: Sarah Craig

Jeff Schorey

University of Notre Dame Professor Jeff Schorey, associate director of the Eck Institute for Global Health and a member of the Center for Rare and Neglected Diseases, is part of a team of researchers who received one of 10 new Grand Challenges in Global Health (GCGH) Grants from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to identify biomarkers for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB).

TB is one of the world’s deadliest infectious diseases with an estimated 9 million individuals diagnosed and 1.6 million deaths every year. This makes TB the second leading cause of death by an infectious agent, behind only HIV.

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Sapirstein named Outstanding Referee by APS

Author: Shelly Goethals

Sapirstein180

Professor Jonathan Sapirstein has been named as an Outstanding Referee by the American Physical Society for 2012. The American Physical Society initiated the highly selective award program in 2008 to recognize scientists who have been exceptionally helpful in assessing manuscripts for publication in the APS journals.

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David Lodge attends White House Great Lakes event

Author: William G. Gilroy

David Lodge

David Lodge, The Ludmilla F. and Stephen J. Galla Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Notre Dame and a world-renowned expert on invasive species, was invited to attend a White House Community Leaders Briefing on the Great Lakes Region that took place today (Feb. 29) in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building.

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