News » Archives » November 2013

NASA awards career fellowship to Notre Dame astrophysicist

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Justin Crepp

NASA has awarded Justin R. Crepp, the Freimann Assistant Professor of Physics at the University of Notre Dame, with an Early Career Fellowship. He is the only awardee in the nation to receive the fellowship in the Origins of Solar Systems program. Crepp’s project, “Working at the Diffraction Limit: New Exoplanetary Science in the Era of ‘Extreme’ Adaptive Optics,” was selected through a competitive proposal process, followed by peer review in a second round of evaluation.

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Arjia Rinpoche discusses the practice of cultivating compassion with the Notre Dame community

Author: Shadia Ajam

Arjia Rinpoche

A group of Buddhist monks recently visited Notre Dame from November 18-21 to construct a peace sand mandala. As part of their visit, they gave a presentation about the power and practice of compassion called, Taking in Harshness and Giving out Kindness. The primary presenter, Arjia Rinpoche, director of the Tibetan Mongolian Cultural Center in Bloomington, Ind., was accompanied by seven monks from the Labrang Tashi Kyil Monastery in Dehra Dun, India.

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D’Souza-Schorey speaks at Global Summit

Author: Stephanie Healey

D'Souza-Schorey

Last Friday (Nov. 15), Crislyn D’Souza-Schorey, professor of biological sciences, participated in the Jefferson Educational Society’s Global Summit in Erie, Pa.  She gave a presentation titled, “New Insights into Cancer Progression: Biology and Clinical Promise.”  Established in 2009, the Global Summit is a week-long series of presentations about broad range of global issues that aim to engage nearly 2,500 attendees in high-level dialogue about these issues.

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Talk Science discusses research in mathematics and big data

Author: Shadia Ajam

Mitchell Faulk at Talk Science

The students from Scientia, the undergraduate journal of scientific research, host a monthly seminar series called Talk Science that highlights the work of undergraduate and faculty researchers at Notre Dame. This month’s presenters were senior mathematics major Mitchell Faulk and Nitesh Chawla, the Frank Freimann Collegiate Associate Professor of Engineering in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering.

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Diversity, Culture, Religion in Science highlights the role of cultural and religious diversity in science and industry

Author: Shadia Ajam

biga250

This past Saturday (Nov. 16), over 210 University of Notre Dame undergraduate and graduate students from across the university gathered in the Jordan Hall of Science for Diversity, Culture, Religion in Science, a one-credit, one-day course offered by the College of Science. The course aims to introduce students to the role of cultural and religious diversity in science, its importance in an era of globalization, and the interesting questions that it raises. To do this, the course invited speakers from diverse backgrounds to talk about how these issues have shaped their respective careers, and how these issues are shaping the future.

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Tibetan Buddhist monks to construct peace sand mandala at Notre Dame

Author: Stephanie Healey

Construction of a sand mandala

The University of Notre Dame’s Ruth M. Hillebrand Center for Compassionate Care in Medicine, the College of Science and the Harper Cancer Research Institute will host Arjia Rinpoche, director of the Tibetan Mongolian Buddhist Cultural Center in Bloomington, Ind., and seven Tibetan Buddhist monks from Labrang Tashi Kyil Monastery in Dehra Dun, India, for the construction of a peace sand mandala and a presentation on compassion from Nov. 18-21 (Monday-Thursday).

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Looking to undergraduates for new ideas in the study of breast cancer

Author: Angela Cavalieri

Katia Fernandez Soto

Katia Fernandez Soto and Andjela Pehar, two science students researching in Jenifer Prosperi’s lab at the Harper Cancer Research Institute, are making strides in the quest to understand the role of the APC tumor-suppressor in breast cancer.

At the Harper Cancer Research Institute, Jenifer Prosperi, assistant professor of biochemistry & molecular biology at the Indiana University School of Medicine - South Bend and adjunct assistant professor of biological sciences at the University of Notre Dame, is up against a formidable opponent: metaplastic breast cancer. Fortunately, she’s bringing reinforcements.  


 

Since 2012, when Prosperi arrived at Harper, two Notre Dame undergraduates have researched cancer alongside her: junior Katia Fernandez Soto and senior Andjela Pehar.

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Math for Everyone shares glimpses of soliton theory

Author: Shadia Ajam

Alex Kasmen, Math for Everyone speaker

This past Thursday (Nov. 7) at the Math for Everyone lecture series, Alex Kasman from the Department of Mathematics at the College of Charleston gave a presentation about soliton theory, which combines algebra and geometry with the study of waves and elementary particles.

 

 

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New Notre Dame research offers new insights into the nature of important human pathogen

Author: William G. Gilroy

Shahriar Mobashery

New research from a team led by Shahriar Mobashery, Navari Family Chair in Life Sciences at the University of Notre Dame, offers an insight into cell wall recycling and virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important human pathogen. The research provides a road map for how the post-genomic analyses of biochemical processes will take place to elucidate important metabolic processes.

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Maldacena explores profound relationship between gravity and particle physics

Author: Shadia Ajam

Juan Maldacena

This past Wednesday (Nov. 6), the John A. Lynch Lecture Series and Department of Physics welcomed Juan Maldacena, a professor from the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ for a presentation titled, “Strings, Gauge Theories and Gravity.”

In one of the most-cited papers in the history of physics, Maldacena discovered a hidden relationship between Einstein’s theory of gravity, which describes black holes and the universe as a whole, and quantum field theories, which describe the interactions of subatomic particles. He is now using that relationship to connect our understanding of nuclear physics to black holes, and to connect string theory to cosmology.

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Umesh Garg appointed to Committee on Constitution and Bylaws of the American Physical Society

Author: Stephanie Healey

Umesh Garg

Umesh Garg, professor of physics, has been appointed to the Committee on Constitution and Bylaws (CCB) of the American Physical Society (APS) by President-elect Malcom Beasley. Garg’s three-year term will begin January 1, 2014.  The CCB consists of six appointed members who are responsible for recommending actions concerning the Constitution and Bylaws of the society and of its divisions, topical groups, forums, and sections.

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Researchers gain new insights into brain neuronal networks

Author: Gene Stowe and Marissa Gebhard

A bow-tie representation of the network of connections between cortical areas in the brain

A paper published in a special edition of the journal Science proposes a novel understanding of brain architecture using a network representation of connections within the primate cortex. Zoltán Toroczkai, professor of physics at the University of Notre Dame and co-director of the Interdisciplinary Center for Network Science and Applications, is a co-author of the paper “Cortical High-Density Counterstream Architectures.”

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Over 400 students learn about undergraduate research opportunities at annual research fair

Author: Shadia Ajam

Emily Kunce presents her research at FURF 2013

This past Thursday, October 31, more than 400 students gathered at the Jordan Hall of Science for the annual Fall Undergraduate Research Fair to learn about getting involved in undergraduate research at Notre Dame and other locations. The fair began with a research internship information session led primarily by biological sciences students; followed by student poster presentations of summer research projects and information tables of organizations that provide or support undergraduate research; and concluded with an information session for undergraduate research opportunities in chemistry.

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The Silent Gene

Author: Michael Rodio

Jenifer Prosperi

Jenifer Prosperi, a researcher at the Harper Cancer Research Institute, is studying how to treat breast cancers that evolve when a crucial tumor suppressor gene goes silent.

Over the past 15 years, the scientific community has come to understand that breast cancer is a monster with many faces.

Some cancers have one of three special indicator molecules (HER2, estrogen receptors and progesterone receptors) that can guide targeted anti-cancer treatments. But another set of breast cancers, the “triple-negative” types, lack those three indicator molecules that can guide treatment. And even now, the question remains: How can doctors better target and treat triple-negative cancers? And how can they keep up the treatment when breast cancers fight back?

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