News » Archives » January 2014

Karsten Grove receives Humboldt Research Award

Author: Shadia Ajam

Karsten Grove

Karsten Grove, Rev. Howard J. Kenna, C.S.C. Professor of Mathematics, recently received a research award from the Alexander con Humboldt Stiftung/Foundation in Germany. The Humbolt Foundation’s award allows individuals to travel to Germany and work on a research project of their choice in collaboration with a host.

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Students discuss summer math opportunities

Author: Shadia Ajam

Math for Everyone Series

This semester’s Math for Everyone series launched last Thursday (Jan. 23), with a panel of students discussing the topic, “What to do mathematically over the summer.”

Moderated by Jeff Diller, professor of mathematics and director for the Seminar for Undergraduate Mathematics Research (SUMR) program, the panel featured five students who spent a summer attending a mathematics-based Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program.

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Prashant Kamat reaches an h-index over 100

Author: Stephanie Healey

Prashant Kamat

Prashant Kamat, The Rev. John A. Zahm, C.S.C. Professor of Science has earned a Hersch-index (h-index) over 100, an achievement attained only by the best and most accomplished scientists.

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Researchers identify a low-cost alternative material for next-generation solar cells

Author: Stephanie Healey

Solar Panels

With the continual increase in demand for global energy, scientists across the world are working to find a way to transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources that are more efficient and environmentally friendly. The sun delivers more energy to the Earth’s surface in one hour than the entire world uses in one year, and realizing the full potential of solar power will require finding effective, inexpensive ways to utilize this vast energy source.

A new paper published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society has identified a possible inorganic material for perovskite solar cells, which provides a lower-cost alternative to the organic polymers currently used in the cells.

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New study changes conceptions about the determinants of skull development and form

Author: William G. Gilroy

Matthew Ravosa

A new study by a team of researchers led by Matthew Ravosa, professor of biological sciences and concurrent professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering and anthropology at the University of Notre Dame, offers surprising insights into dietary influences on the growing skull.

Ravosa notes that the robust jaws and large, thick-enameled molars of the first human ancestors from Africa, known as australopiths, have long been interpreted as adaptations for hard object feeding, especially in the genus Paranthropus robustus, and to a lesser extent, Australopithecus.

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Triple C brings nature and fitness education to South Bend youth

Author: Stephanie Healey

triple_c_rock_climbing_trip250

When she’s not hard at work in the laboratory, biological sciences graduate student Victoria Lam, loves to spend her time outdoors. This past year, she created a new program to share her passion for the outdoors with South Bend area school children called Triple C.

Triple C, or Camping, Climbing, and Cameras, takes a three-pronged approach to connecting youth to the outdoors.  The activities and lessons in the program are focused on three major areas, education in ecology and wilderness preservation, sports and nature photography, and participation in outdoor recreation.

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Rare brown dwarf discovery provides benchmark for future exoplanet research

Author: Gene Stowe

Direct image detection of a rare brown dwarf companion taken at Keck Observatory (Crepp et al. 2014, ApJ)

A team of researchers led by Justin R. Crepp, the Freimann Assistant Professor of Physics at the University of Notre Dame, has directly imaged a very rare type of brown dwarf that can serve as a benchmark for studying objects with masses that lie between stars and planets. The team’s paper on the discovery, “The TRENDS High-Contrast Imaging Survey. V. Discovery of an Old and Cold Benchmark T-dwarf Orbiting the Nearby G-star HD 19467,” was recently published in The Astrophysical Journal.

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New study reveals links between alcoholic liver disease and the circadian clock

Author: William G. Gilroy

liver

Researchers from the University of Notre Dame and the Indiana University School of Medicine have revealed a putative role for the circadian clock in the liver in the development of alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis, or fatty liver disease.

Hepatic steatosis is the abnormal accumulation of fats in the cells of the liver, and is linked to disturbed control of fat metabolism. Alcohol-induced liver steatosis is produced by excessive alcohol consumption and is linked to hepatitis, or inflammation of the liver.

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Corcelli accepts appointment to ACS Graduate Education Advisory Board

Author: Rebecca Hicks

corcelli

Steven Corcelli, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame, has accepted an invitation to serve as Vice-Chair of the Graduate Education Advisory Board (GEAB) of the American Chemical Society (ACS). Corcelli has been a member of the GEAB since 2012.

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QuarkNet receives funding from Notre Dame International

Author: Stephanie Healey

quarknet_square

The QuarkNet Center at Notre Dame recently received an award of $8,000 from Notre Dame International for Masterclass Institutes Collaborating in the Americas (MICA). MICA, directed by Kenneth Cecire, national QuarkNet staff teacher, and Mitchell Wayne, professor of physics at the University of Notre Dame, will use the funding to create a partnership in particle physics education between Notre Dame and Pontifical Catholic University in Santiago, Chile.

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Navari accepts World Health Organization assignment

Author: Gail Hinchion Mancini

Rudolph M

Rudolph M. Navari, M.D., Ph.D., FACP, adjunct professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame and associate dean and director of the Indiana University School of Medicine-South Bend (IUSM-SB), has accepted a position with the World Health Organization (WHO) to serve as the director of the Cancer Care Program in Eastern Europe. His new role will begin in April 2014.

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Notre Dame and Loyola join forces against cancer

Author: William G. Gilroy

Karen Dahl lab, Harper Hall

The University of Notre Dame and Loyola University Chicago are joining forces in a multidisciplinary cancer research collaboration.

The goal of the alliance is to provide direct support for revolutionary new cancer research, with the ultimate objective of making cancer a more manageable, and potentially curable, disease.

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2013: The year in review

Author: Brittany Collins

 

Telescope installation

The calendar year 2013 was filled with many notable moments of accomplishment, celebration and reflection at the University of Notre Dame. Some of the significant events include the 50th anniversary of the Hesburgh Library, the reopening of the Morris Inn after extensive renovations, and the men’s soccer team winning the national title for the first time in its history.

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