News » Archives » 2015

Aprahamian reappointed to South Dakota Science position

Author: Shelly Goethals

Ani Aprahamian

Ani Aprahamian, the Freimann Professor of Physics, has been reappointed as a Board Member by Governor Dennis Daugaard to the South Dakota Science and Technology Authority. The reappointment is through December 2018. She has served on the board since 2009.

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NDnano announces summer 2016 undergraduate research opportunities

Author: Heidi Deethardt

Nano

Several science and engineering faculty affiliated with Notre Dame’s Center for Nano Science and Technology (NDnano) have full-time, 10-week research opportunities available for summer 2016. Applications will be accepted through February 5, 2016.

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Obesity contributes to metastasis in ovarian cancer patients

Author: William G. Gilroy

Harper Cancer Center

M. Sharon Stack, Ann F. Dunne and Elizabeth Riley Director of the HCRI and professor of chemistry and biochemistry, notes that ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the U.S. Researchers set out to determine whether obesity contributes to ovarian cancer metastatic success. In other words, are tumor cells better able to successfully metastasize when the “host” is obese versus lean?

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Physicist Jay LaVerne named AAAS fellow

Author: William G. Gilroy

 

jaylaverne

Jay LaVerne, professional specialist in the University of Notre Dame’s Radiation Laboratory and a concurrent research professor of physics, has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in honor of his efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished.

LaVerne’s research concerns the examination of the energy loss, charge and other properties of ionizing radiation and to elucidate the fundamental radiolytic decomposition of molecules and the subsequent kinetics of the reactive transients.

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Countries on the rebound making significant climate adaptation progress, ND-GAIN data show

Author: Joyce Coffee

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In the lead-up to 21st meeting of the Conference of Parties (COP 21), 10 countries have come from behind to make marked progress in their ability to withstand the shocks and stresses of climate change, while five are distinctly less resilient, according to data released Tuesday (Nov. 17) by the University of Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index (ND-GAIN).

Over the last five years, the 10 countries that have made the biggest jump on the ND-GAIN Country Index to become better climate adapters are Cote d’Ivoire, Laos, Georgia, The Philippines, Russia, Poland, Rwanda, Mongolia, Guinea and the Solomon Islands.

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WHO's LF elimination program is not enough

Author: William G. Gilroy

lf

More than 1 billion people in tropical and subtropical countries are at risk for lymphatic filariasis (LF), also known as elephantiasis. The World Health Organization has set a goal to eliminate LF in vulnerable countries through mass drug administrations, an effort that has seen dramatic results. However, a new study suggests that WHO’s recommendations for elimination are not enough.

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Finding the right research opportunity

Author: Shadia Ajam

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Recently, science students gathered at the Jordan Hall of Science for the annual Fall Undergraduate Research Fair on October 29 to learn about getting involved in undergraduate research at Notre Dame, around the country, and around the world. The fair began with an information session on undergraduate research opportunities in chemistry, followed by student poster presentations and another information session on internships.

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Environment of tumors impacts metastasis, study finds

Author: Gene Stowe

Siyuan Zhang

If a tumor is like a seed, the soil around it plays a significant role in its growth, a new study finds.

According to the study’s results, the microenvironment of a tumor cell has significant impact on cancer metastasis. This discovery by Siyuan Zhang at Notre Dame and a team at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has focused attention on fighting cancer in the tumor cell’s microenvironment.

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AD&T to Host Top Analytical Chemists at Annual Symposium

Author: Melissa Endres

Undergraduate Research

Advanced Diagnostics & Therapeutics will be hosting its 4th Annual Symposium featuring several of the premier analytical chemists in the country. The Symposium will be held Tuesday, October 27, from 9:00—5:00. You can visit the Symposium’s event page for more information and for an official agenda.

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Angewandte Chemie peer reviewers rank Henderson paper in top 10 percent

Author: Gene Stowe

 

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Notre Dame researchers led by Ken Henderson have achieved a critical step in the search for rapid molecular-based computing. The group demonstrated the ability to move an electron within a neutral molecule, providing the binary switch necessary for computing. A key advance is that the molecule does not require the presence of a second molecule to generate the electron, which creates bias in the system.

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Dr. Matthew Hubbard shares insights on bariatric surgery

Author: Shadia Ajam

Matt Hubbard

Each year the Dr. Tom Dooley Society, an organization of the medical alumni of Notre Dame, hosts game day lectures that bring together physicians, dentists, licensed medical practitioners, and other members of the Notre Dame community. This past Saturday (Oct.17), the Society welcomed Matthew Owen Hubbard, ’02, MD, ’12 MS  from the Yale Bariatric Surgery Program.

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Hummon receives ACS Rising Star Award

Author: Gene Stowe

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Amanda Hummon, the Husking Foundation, Inc. Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, has received a 2016 Rising Star Award from the American Chemical Society’s Women Chemist Committee. Hummon will accept the award at the national American Chemical Society (ACS) meeting in San Diego in March. 

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Alumnus Paul Lambert and Frederick J Angulo, DVM PhD share their experiences with the Dooley Society

Author: Shadia Ajam

Frederick Angulo

Each year the Dooley Society awards stipends to a group of current Notre Dame students or alumni in medical school. Recipients are awarded these stipends to cover funds for international medical missions. This past Saturday (Oct. 19), Paul Lambert ‘12 shared his experience as a volunteer in Tutwiler, Mississippi. Following his presentation, Dr. Fred Angulo from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention presented on the lingering effects of ebola.

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Alumnus Thomas Banchoff presents work on the fourth dimension

Author: Shadia Ajam

Thomas Banchoff

This past Thursday (Oct. 8) at the Math for Everyone lecture series, geometer and emeritus professor at Brown University Thomas F. Banchoff gave a presentation titled “Exploring the Fourth Dimension in Geometry, Literature, and Art.”

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Senior Mark Brahier explores barriers to healthcare in Nicaragua

Author: Stephanie Healey

Mark Brahier interviews a garbage dump worker in Nicaragua

Mark Brahier, a senior biological sciences major and international development studies minor, spent five weeks in Nicaragua this summer.  Traveling with International Samaritan on his fourth trip to Central America, Brahier set out to study social, political, economic, and geographic barriers to healthcare access.

“As a student studying biology and international development, this research project was a great way to show how all of my interests intersect, since it is very interdisciplinary,” Brahier said. “When I arrived in Nicaragua, I quickly realized there were more important areas of research to explore and changed the focus of my project.”

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Scientia hosts first Talk Science of the year

Author: Luke Maillie

Talk Science

Last week the undergraduate journal for scientific research, Scientia, kicked off its Talk Science series. Each month, the series invites one undergraduate and one faculty member to speak about their research, and science in general. This month featured undergraduate chemistry major Toby Turney and Prof. Nancy Michael, who is the director of undergraduate studies for neuroscience and behavior.

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