Chemistry & Biochemistry Courses

For specific questions regarding undergraduate course offerings in chemistry and biochemistry , please contact the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry or consult the Undergraduate Bulletin of Information 2015-2016.

 

CHEM 08999. Research Experience for High School Students

(0 -0- 0)
This is a zero-credit course for students engaged in independent research or working with a faculty member or a member of the University staff on a special project. Registration requires a brief description of the research or project to be pursued and the permission of the director of the Summer Session. No course work is required. 

CHEM 10101. Foundations of Chemistry

(3-0-3)
This course covers forms, properties, and separation of matter; atomic structure and periodicity; nuclear chemistry; chemical bonding and structure; reactivity with applications to acid-base and oxidation-reduction reactions; and chemistry of carbon and living systems. This course is not open to students who have taken the equivalent of CHEM 10171 or 10181.

CHEM 10102. Chemistry, Environment, and Energy

(3-0-3)
Chemistry of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere; agricultural chemistry and pesticides; food and drugs; hazardous and solid wastes; and recycling. Fossil fuels; nuclear, solar, geothermal, and other types of energy. This course is not open to students who have taken the equivalent of CHEM 10171 or 10181.

CHEM 10104. Forensic Chemistry

(2-3-3)
This three-credit course introduces non-science majors to aspects of chemistry and biochemistry as applied to law enforcement. Topics include legal and scientific standards of proof, biometrics, drug detection, crime scene investigation, case studies and guest speakers. Students do several lab experiments using modern analytical instrumentation.

CHEM 10109. Themes in Chemistry

(3-0-3)
Explore the world of chemistry through the work of some of the most important scientists of the past hundred years. By examining case studies based on a single theme, develop the background necessary to understand why these experiments and theories captured the imagination of contemporaries and provided lasting impact and relevance. Understand how subsequent generations of scientists built
on these ideas and were able to expand the subject.

CHEM 10122. General Chemistry: Fundamental Principles and Biological Processes

(3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CHEM 10171 or CHEM 10181
This one-semester course (taught in spring semester) completes two semester chemistry sequence for most engineering students. Fundamental principles of chemistry are woven into key themes of modern biology, including protein structure and function, gene structure and manipulation, and the basics of biotechnology. Emphasis is placed on common themes rather than biological details, and examples are drawn from biological systems of interest to engineers.

CHEM 10171. Introduction to Chemical Principles

(4-0-4)
Corequisites: CHEM 11171, CHEM 12171
This one-semester course, offered in the Fall, provides a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles governing chemical structure and reactivity. It is accompanied by laboratory work and by a tutorial section. Topics to be discussed include the quantum mechanical structure of atoms, models of chemical bonding, chemical equilibrium, acidity and basicity, and thermochemistry and thermodynamics. Recommended for students in the College of Engineering, College of Science, and for all pre-professional students.

CHEM 10172. Organic Structure and Reactivity

(4-0-4)
Prerequisites: CHEM 10171 or CHEM 10181 or CHEM 10118 or CHEM 10122
Corequisite: CHEM 11172
This class, generally taught in the Spring, is the first semester of a two-semester organic chemistry sequence intended for students in biological sciences and pre-professional studies. It is accompanied by laboratory work and by a tutorial
section. The course provides a solid foundation in organic structure and bonding, spectroscopy, and Lewis acid/base reactions. These concepts are then applied to understand substitution and elimination reactions with a focus on mechanism and factors governing selectivity. A section of this course, taught in the fall semester, is intended for chemical engineering students.

CHEM 10181. Introduction to Chemical Principles

(4-0-4)
Corequisite: CHEM 11181, CHEM 12181
This course provides a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles governing chemical structure and reactivity. Topics to be discussed include the quantum mechanical structure of atoms, models of chemical bonding, chemical equilibrium, acidity and basicity, and thermochemistry and thermodynamics. Recommended for students with a special interest in the subject, especially those intending to major in chemistry or biochemistry. Lectures will be supplemented with a weekly tutorial session.

CHEM 10182. Organic Structure and Mechanism

(4-0-4)
Prerequisite: CHEM 10171 or CHEM 10181
Corequisite: CHEM 11182, CHEM 12182
Basic principles of organic chemistry, including fundamental aspects of organic and biological structures and bonding, stereochemistry, the effect of structure on physical and chemical properties, and applications of spectroscopic methods to assign structures. A detailed analysis of organic chemical reactivity, including reactive intermediates and mechanistic principles. Introductory applications of reactions in synthesis. Intended primarily for chemistry and  biochemistry majors. Lectures will be supplemented with a weekly tutorial session.

CHEM 11171. Introduction to Chemical Principles Laboratory

(0-3-0)
Corequisite: CHEM 10171, CHEM 12171
This lab involves experimental work to accompany CHEM 10171 lecture.

CHEM 11172. Organic Structure and Reactivity Laboratory

(0-3-0)
Corequisite: CHEM 10172
Experimental work to accompany CHEM 10172.

CHEM 11181. Introduction to Chemical Principles Laboratory

(0-3-0)
Corequisite: CHEM 10181, CHEM 12181
A laboratory to accompany CHEM 10181 that will stress quantitative measurements.

CHEM 11182. Organic Structure and Mechanism Laboratory

(0-3-0)
Corequisite: CHEM 10182
A laboratory to accompany CHEM 10182 that will emphasize fundamental organic techniques.

CHEM 12171. Introduction to Chemical Principles Tutorial

(1-0-0)
Corequisite: CHEM 10171, CHEM 11171
Tutorial section to accompany CHEM 10171.

CHEM 12172. Structure and Reactivity Tutorial


(1-0-0)
Corequisite: CHEM 10172, CHEM 11172
Tutorial section to accompany CHEM 10172.

CHEM 12181. Introduction to Chemical Principles Tutorial

(1-0-0)
Corequisite: CHEM 10181, CHEM 11181
Tutorial that accompanies CHEM 10181.

CHEM 12182. Organic Structure and Mechanism—Tutorial

(1-0-0)
Corequisite: CHEM 10182
Tutorial that accompanies CHEM 10182.

CHEM 13171. Chemistry Adjunct Seminar

(1-0-1)
This is a one-credit course taught in tandem with the chemistry lecture. The aims of this course are to provide students with the tools to become independent learners and to build a community of learners through demonstrating and discussing effective study habits and university-level study skills. Topics include preparing for class/lab, getting the most out of a lecture, how to read a science text book, concept cards and concept mapping, talk-throughs, test preparation, successful study groups, and self-analysis and monitoring one's learning. Students who complete this course should be able to exercise active study strategies, have increased confidence in how to approach their studies for upper-level courses, and grow in their abilities to think critically, analyze concepts, synthesize information, propose and test hypotheses, and problem solve. 

CHEM 13172. Chemistry Adjunct Seminar

(1-0-1)
This is a one-credit course taught in tandem with the chemistry lecture. The aims of this course are to provide students with the tools to become independent learners and to build a community of learners through demonstrating and discussing effective study habits and university-level study skills. Topics include preparing for class/lab, getting the most out of a lecture, how to read a science text book, concept cards and concept mapping, talk-throughs, test preparation, successful study groups, and self-analysis and monitoring one's learning. Students who complete this course should be able to exercise active study strategies, have increased confidence in how to approach their studies for upper-level courses, and grow in their abilities to think critically, analyze concepts, synthesize information, propose and test hypotheses, and problem solve. 

CHEM 20204. Environmental Chemistry

(3-0-3)
Discussion of basic chemical processes occurring in the environment, particularly those relating to the impact of humanity’s technological enterprise.

CHEM 20262. Mathematical Methods for the Chemical Sciences

(3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MATH 10560
This course provides chemistry and biochemistry majors with mathematical background, chemical context, and problem-solving methods for problems that involve differential equations, linear algebra, and probability and statistics.

CHEM 20273. Organic Reactions and Applications

(3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CHEM 10172 or CHEM 10182
A second semester covering the basic principles of organic chemistry, including structure, bonding, physical and chemical properties, reactive intermediates, and reaction mechanisms. Additional emphasis on applications of reactions in synthesis and relationships to biochemical systems and other associated areas of current interest. Intended primarily for pre-professional and biological science majors. This course is generally taken in the fall semester with the laboratory CHEM 21273. A section is offered in the spring semester for chemical engineering students.

CHEM 20274. Chemistry Across the Periodic Table

(3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CHEM 20273 or CHEM 20283
Chemistry course that completes the 2-year chemistry sequence for students in the College of Science, chemical engineers, and preprofessional students. Extends principles of chemistry with an in-depth look at the periodic table and an emphasis on bioinorganic chemistry. Topics include: bonding across the periodic table, chemistry of the s- and p-block elements, d-block elements and coordination chemistry, and kinetics, catalysis, and redox/electrochemistry with applications to biological systems. This course is generally taken in the spring semester with the laboratory CHEM 21274.

CHEM 20283. Organic Reactions and Applications

(3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CHEM 10182
Corequisite: CHEM 21283
A second semester covering the basic principles of organic chemistry, including structures, bonding, physical and chemical properties, reactive intermediates, and reaction mechanisms. Additional emphasis on applications of reactions in synthesis and relationships to biochemical systems and other associated areas of current interest. Intended primarily for chemistry and biochemistry majors.

CHEM 20284. Chemistry Across the Periodic Table

(3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CHEM 20273 or CHEM 20283
Corequisite: CHEM 21284
This course will extend general principles of chemistry with an in-depth view of the rest of the periodic table. Topics covered include: bonding across the periodic table, chemistry of the s- and p-blocks, d-block and coordination chemistry, as
well as chemical reactivity, kinetics, catalysis, and redox/electrochemistry.

CHEM 21273. Organic Reactions and Applications Laboratory

(0-3-1)
Prerequisite: CHEM 11172 or CHEM 11182
Experiments to accompany CHEM 20273

CHEM 21274. Chemistry Across the Periodic Table Laboratory

(0-3-1)
Prerequisite: CHEM 11172 or CHEM 11182
Experiments to accompany CHEM 20274.

CHEM 21283. Organic Reactions and Applications Laboratory

(0-3-1)
Corequisite: CHEM 20283
A laboratory to accompany CHEM 20283 that will emphasize organic techniques and synthesis.

CHEM 21284. Chemistry Across the Periodic Table Laboratory

(0-3-1)
Corequisite: CHEM 20284
A laboratory to accompany CHEM 20284 emphasizing inorganic synthesis and studies of chemical reactivity.

CHEM 22262. Mathematical Methods for Chemical Sciences Tutorial 

(1-0-0)

This tutorial is designed to augment the mathematical and software background necessary to succeed in CHEM 20262. Mathematical topics covered will include a basic review of logarithms and standard methods from calculus, including derivatives and integration. A significant portion of the tutorial will cover the computational software utilized in CHEM 20262. 

CHEM 23201. Chemistry Seminar

(1-0-1)
To be taken fall semester of the sophomore year. Introduction to the communication of scientific knowledge.

CHEM 23202. Chemistry Seminar

(1-0-1)
To be taken either semester of the sophomore through senior years. Introduction to the communication of scientific knowledge.

CHEM 23212. Biochemistry Seminar

(1-0-0)
A zero-credit seminar course offered in the fall term for sophomore biochemistry majors only. The seminar seeks to acquaint the biochemistry majors with 1) the biochemistry faculty members; 2) the types of research programs in biochemistry that are being carried out in the department; and 3) some general biochemistry concepts. Each meeting will be conducted by a different member of the biochemistry faculty.

CHEM 24262. Math for Chemists

(.75-0-.75)

Computational Chemistry: Recommended text: "Mathematics for Chemistry", Doggett & Sutcliffe, Longman, 1995. Functions. Some feel for different functions and their properties (e.g. ex, ln x, sin/cos/tan); coordinates, tangents etc; even/odd functions.

CHEM 30321. Physical Chemistry I

(3-0-3)
Prerequisites: (MATH 10560 or MATH 10850 or MATH 20550) and (PHYS 30220 or PHYS 10320 or PHYS 10096 or PHYS 10094 or PHYS 20330 or CHEM 20262)
A rigorous course in the fundamentals of physical chemistry, including chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and the elements of atomic and molecular structure.

CHEM 30322. Physical Chemistry II

(3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CHEM 30321
For science majors only. Second semester of Physical Chemistry. A rigorous course in the fundamentals of physical chemistry, including chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and the elements of atomic and molecular structure.

CHEM 30324. Physical Chemistry for Engineers

(3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CHEM 10171 or CHEM 10181 and PHYS 10320
A course in the fundamentals of physical chemistry, emphasizing theoretical and experimental aspects of reaction kinetics, an introduction to quantum theory and a critical appreciation of the nature of the chemical bond. The course also explores how spectroscopic techniques allow us to gain insight into the structure and properties of molecules.

CHEM 30331. Chemistry in Service of the Community

(1-0-1)
Prerequisite: CHEM 30333 (may be taken concurrently)
Addressing the problem of lead contamination in the community, students will visit area homes and collect paint, dust, and soil samples. After analyzing these samples in CHEM 31333, students will help homeowners reduce the health risks associated with exposing young children to lead.

CHEM 30333. Analytical Chemistry I

(3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CHEM 10171 or CHEM 10181
Corequisite: CHEM 31333
Introduction to the principles, theory, and applications of analytical chemistry. Course covers modern methods for separation of mixtures, quantitative and qualitative analysis and trace analysis.

CHEM 30337. Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences

(3-0-3)
Introduction to the fundamental principles of physical chemistry with application to modern biological problems. Emphases will include classical and statistical thermodynamics and a survey of biological spectroscopy.

CHEM 30341. Fundamentals of Biochemistry

(3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CHEM 20273 or CHEM 20283
Corequisite: CHEM 31341
This course is offered for undergraduate biochemistry majors and is generally taken in the junior year. The course covers the basic chemical and physical principles of the primary biomolecules: protein, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids. The structures and properties of these molecules and their relevance to biological processes will be integrated.

CHEM 30342. Intermediary Metabolism

(3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CHEM 30341
This course is offered for undergraduate biochemistry majors. The course is a study of the major metabolic processes involving energy storage and utilization, emphasizing the relationships between biomolecular structure and metabolic function. Throughput, regulation, and integration of pathways are presented.

CHEM 31322. Physical Chemistry Laboratory

(0-6-2)
Prerequisite: CHEM 30321
Corequisite: CHEM 30322
A course in the experimental aspects of physical chemistry using modern techniques of measurement. The laboratory includes thermodynamic, kinetic measurements, spectroscopic measurements, and measurements in reaction dynamics.

CHEM 31333. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

(0-3-1)
Corequisite: CHEM 30333
A laboratory course in the techniques of analytical chemistry.

CHEM 31341. Fundamentals of Biochemistry Laboratory

(0-6-2)
Corequisite: CHEM 30341
This course is designed to let students explore some of the techniques that are utilized in characterizing proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acids. It exposes students to modern biochemical and instrumental methods for elucidating the structural and functional properties of these important types of molecules. Biochemistry majors only.

CHEM 40420. Principles of Biochemistry

(3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CHEM 20273 or CHEM 20283
A general treatment of the various areas of modern biochemistry including protein structure and function, bioenergetics, molecular basis of genetic and developmental processes, cellular mechanisms and intermediary metabolism.

CHEM 40434. Physical Methods of Chemistry

(3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CHEM 20274 or CHEM 20284
A course in molecular structure examined through the theory and interpretation of spectra. The focus is on infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography, with exposure to other techniques such as two-dimensional NMR, Raman spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, and electron spin resonance. Spring.

CHEM 40435. Electrochemistry and Electrochemical Engineering 

(3-0-3)

This course addresses the fundamentals and applications of technologies that rely on heterogeneous electron transfer reactions. The first part of the course addresses fundamental aspects of electron transfer reactions at electrified interfaces, including band structure of metals and semiconductors, electrochemical potentials, electron transfer kinetics and Marcus theory, potential step and potential sweep experiments, hydrodynamic electrochemistry, potentiometry and ion-selective electrodes, impedance measurements, and electrochemical instrumentation. The second part of the course addresses applications to energy storage (batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors), energy conversion (photovoltaics), bioelectrochemistry, including neurochemistry, corrosion, and electrolysis and electroplating. 

CHEM 40436. Instrumental Methods of Analysis

(3 -0- 3)
Prerequisite: CHEM 20274 or CHEM 20284
This course provides an understanding of how instrumentation used in the laboratory works. Modern science relies on advanced instrumentation to detect and analyze chemical compounds. In this class, instrument design is broken down into fundamental components, such as signal filtering, detection, and analysis. The origins of different chemical signals as well as the strengths and limitations of different techniques are discussed. 

CHEM 40438. Polymer Chemistry: From Principle to Practice

(3-0-3)
This course offers the basic physical and organic chemistry knowledge in polymerization reactions. Topics to be covered include mechanisms of polymerization reactions; polymerization kinetics and thermodynamics; relationship of physical properties to structure and composition; correlations of applications with chemical constitution; functional polymers for medicines and electronics. The course is recommended for students with special interest in polymer materials and future plan on polymer research and professional studies. 

CHEM 40439. Bioinstrumental Methods of Analysis

(3-0-3)
This course focuses on the instrumental methods likely to be found in a modern bioanalytical laboratory. The course is tailored to biochemistry majors, and will prepare them for work in an industrial, clinical, or research laboratory. The course consists of two lectures per week and a three-hour laboratory component every other week. Course material highlights nucleic acid analysis (gel electrophoresis, restriction digests, Sanger sequencing, PCR, hybridization arrays), and protein analysis (ELISA-based assays with plate reader, gel electrophoresis and Western blotting, liquid chromatography, tryptic digests and LC/MS-MS). Both nucleic acid and protein analysis components would include an introduction to bioinformatics. 

CHEM 40443. Inorganic Chemistry

(3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CHEM 20274 or CHEM 20284
Group Theory, Molecular Orbital Theory, structure, and spectroscopy are used as vehicles for the examination of inorganic, organometallic, and solid state chemistry.

CHEM 40477. Nanoscience and Technology

(3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CHEM 30324 or CHEM 30321
This course focuses on the unique scientific phenomena that accrue to matter with characteristic nanometer-scale dimensions and on the technologies that can be constructed from them. Special nanostructures will be addressed.

CHEM 40480. Chemistry of Lanthanides and Actinides

(3-0-3)
This course will cover a wide variety of topics involving the chemistry of the f-block elements. Topics will include periodic trends, aqueous and environmental chemistry, solid-state chemistry, and physical properties. The course will begin
with a brief history of the discovery of these elements. The fundamental knowledge gained early in the course will be applied to the critical problems of nuclear energy production and waste remediation. This will be a primary literature-based course.

CHEM 40560. Chemical Biology 

(3-0-3)

This graduate course will approach biological subjects with an intension of integrating them with chemistry in a seamless manner. Knowledge of biology at the freshman level and of one year of organic chemistry will be a pre-requisite. This course is intended for graduate students aspiring to do studies at the interface of chemistry, biochemistry and biology. The course is also open to advanced undergraduates (senior level). 

CHEM 40650. Computational Chemistry I

(3-0-3)

An overview of the fundamental theory, methodology, and applications of computational chemistry. Topics include molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, as well as a wide range of quantum chemistry methods. Applications center on organic molecules and biological systems such as proteins and DNA. Hands-on computer experience is an integral part of these courses. (Fall and spring) 

CHEM 41172. Organic Structure and Reactivity Lab

(0-1-1)
This lab course has the same content as CHEM 11172. 

CHEM 41443. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

(0-6-2)
Prerequisite: CHEM 40443 (may be taken concurrently)
The preparation of main group inorganic, coordination and organometallic compounds, including air-sensitive manipulations and the use of vacuum-line techniques. Characterization of inorganic compounds by spectroscopic and electrochemical methods.

CHEM 46497. Directed Readings

(V-0-V)
In-depth study of topics not covered or only briefly covered in other courses. Readings, problems and reports.

CHEM 48498. Undergraduate Research

(0-V-V)
Research in collaboration with members of the faculty. A written progress report must be submitted each semester, and all participating students must make an oral presentation of their work in the spring semester of senior year.

CHEM 48500. Research Thesis in Chemistry and Biochemistry

(0-0-1)
A course in scientific writing to produce a thesis that describes work undertaken in the course of an undergraduate research project. Through written drafts of a thesis that are critiqued by the thesis director, skills in organizing and presenting scientific data, scientific literacy, and writing are enhanced.

CHEM 48888. Summer Undergraduate Research

(0-0-0)
This is a zero-credit course for visiting and Notre Dame students engaged in research with a faculty member during the Summer Session. This course is taken as an indication of the student’s status on campus and is meant to allow the registered student to use the University facilities as the Summer Session permits.

CHEM 50172. Organic Structure and Reactivity

(3-0-3)
This class, generally taught in the Spring, is the first semester of a two-semester organic chemistry sequence intended for students in the biological sciences and preprofessional studies. The course is accompanied by a tutorial section (no lab). The course provides a solid foundation in organic structure and bonding, spectroscopy, and Lewis acid/base reactions. These concepts are then applied to understand substitution and elimination reactions with a focus on mechanism and factors governing selectivity. 

CHEM 50520. Principles of Biochemistry

(3-0-3)
This is a new graduate offering, which is essentially the same course as CHEM 40420 but for graduate credit. An introduction to the field of biochemistry, including the structure and function of biomolecules, bioenergetics, and the molecular basis of cellular mechanisms including genetics, signaling, and metabolism. Intended for graduate students with no prior biochemistry course experience.

CHEM 50531. Molecular Biology I

(3-0-3)
The first of a two-semester sequence that provides an introduction to molecular biology, molecular genetics, and nucleic acid biochemistry. Topics include: physical chemistry of nucleic acids, bacterial genetics, principles of cloning, DNA replication and recombination, prokaryotic and eukaryotic transcription, and RNA processing and translation. Listed also as BIOS 60531. (Fall)

CHEM 50532. Molecular Biology II

(3-0-3)
Prerequisite: BIOS 60531 or CHEM 50531
The second semester of the sequence. Lecture topics include: yeast genetics and molecular biology; retroviruses and transposable elements; transgenic mice;and special topics covering cell cycle regulation, oncogenes, development in Drosophila, signal transduction, and cloning of human disease genes. Listed also as BIOS 60532. (Spring)

CHEM 51171. Chemical Principals Laboratory 

(1-1-0)

This is a newly-created lab section that is similar to CHEM 11171; however the CHEM 51171 lab does not have the co-requirement of CHEM 10171 lecture. This lab is for students who have already taken CHEM 10171, or its equivalent. 

CHEM 51172. Organic Structure and Reactivity Laboratory

(0 -3- 1)
This is a new crosslist lab section to accompany the existing CHEM 11172. The lab course description is the same for both CHEM 11172 and 51172; however, this crosslist section does not include the co-requirement of CHEM 10172 lecture as it is for students who have already taken CHEM 10172, or its equivalent.