Majors

The six undergraduate departments in the College of Science offer the following degree programs. Students may also choose to pursue a second major in the college (some restrictions may apply), a second major in another college at the University, or a five-year dual degree. Please refer to the Undergraduate Bulletin of Information or your advisor for second major options and restrictions.   Students must enroll in the department of their major sophomore year, but they may change majors until the last day to drop classes of their seventh semester at the University.

Applied and Computational Mathematics and Statistics (ACMS)

The partnership of applied mathematics, computational mathematics, and statistics brings the tools of modeling, simulation and data analysis to bear on real-world problems, producing solutions with the power to predict and explain complex phenomena. These methods, often applied computationally, are being used in a wide variety of areas in business, engineering, the natural sciences, and the social sciences.


Biochemistry

Biochemistry

The biochemistry curriculum explores the chemical foundations of living systems, including the structure, properties, and reactions of biological macromolecules. The biochemistry program is housed in the Department of Chemistry.


Biological Sciences

Biological Sciences

A major in biological science will train students in the latest developments in life science. Undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to incorporate research into their curriculum and university experience. State of the art facilities involving microscopy, DNA sequencing, and extraordinarily equipped faculty laboratories are available to students electing to do research.


Chemistry

Chemistry

Chemistry focuses on the substances that comprise the world around us and is concerned with their structure, their properties and the reactions that change them into other substances. The chemistry curriculum includes two programs: The Chemistry Career Program designed for students interested in a professional career in chemistry, and the Chemistry Combination Program, designed for those students who are interested in combining chemistry with business or computing.


Environmental Sciences

Environmental Sciences

It has become increasingly apparent that all organisms, including humans, have a profoundly interdependent existence. An understanding and awareness of the links between humans and their environment is one of the most important endeavors of the twenty-first century. The environmental sciences major is designed to provide students with this knowledge from scientific and ethical perspectives.


Mathematics

Mathematics

A major in mathematics will deepen a student's knowledge of an endlessly interesting subject, as well as sharpen analytical and problem-solving skills. The curriculum is very flexible, with enough electives in the mix to allow for the customization of the program.


Neuroscience and Behavior

Students view images of the brain in the DVT

Neuroscience is a relatively young, exciting, and fundamentally interdisciplinary field devoted to the study of the nervous system. Problems range from investigation of the evolution of nervous system in basal vertebrates to the application of neuroscience to education and law. Students studying neuroscience will be prepared to pursue professional, graduate or doctoral programs.


Physics

Physics

Undergraduate physics majors are trained to use the most modern equipment, learn about the most current and exciting topics for research, and, most of all, learn to be problem solvers. As the "liberal arts" of the sciences, physics is a training ground for the mind which opens many avenues.


Science Preprofessional Studies

Science Preprofessional Studies

The science preprofessional studies program prepares students for fields such as medicine, dentistry, osteopathy, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, public health, pharmacy, post-baccalaureate nursing, and other health professions.

On average, more than three-fourths of all Notre Dame applicants to M.D. or D.O. programs are accepted.


Science-Business

Science Business

The science-business collegiate sequence is an individualized course of study which incorporates courses from the basic areas of business along with the four basic areas of science.


Science-Computing

Science Computing/

The science-computing collegiate sequence incorporates courses from the four basic areas of science along with a sequence of computing courses. The program will give the student working knowledge of various computer languages and experience using current computer technology.


Science-Education

Science Education

The science-education collegiate sequence incorporates courses from the four basic areas of science along with education courses that most states require to give students the background necessary to receive a certificate to teach in a secondary education system. Course instruction is provided by the College of Science, other colleges of the University and the Education Department at Saint Mary's College.


Statistics

Statistics

The statistics coursework focuses on developing a strong foundation in the methods of applied mathematics and data analysis. The curriculum is flexible and allows students to take courses in a wide variety of application areas.