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The department is delighted to announce the creation of the Nicholas C. Angelotti Undergraduate Research Fund in Analytical Chemistry. The fund, which will provide summer stipends for undergraduate researchers, was formally launched in April with a visit by the family of Nicholas Angelotti.  Included was a lecture by Nicholas’ son, Tim Angelotti, who graduated from Notre Dame in 1985 with a degree in chemistry and is currently an associate professor at the Stanford School of Medicine. The lecture, "Molecular Pharmacology: A biochemical analysis of receptor and ion channel function," described Tim’s work towards defining the molecular basis for receptor specificity with the goal of informing drug design.  Tim’s brother David, a 1985 Notre Dame graduate with a B.S. in engineering, followed the lecture with a few words about his father. Nicholas Angelotti graduated from Notre Dame in 1950 with a bachelor's degree in chemistry, earned a graduate degree at Case Institute of Technology and worked as an analytical chemist for 42 years at Dow Corning Corporation. In addition to Tim and David, Nicholas’ wife Mary Lou, son Steve, and daughter Linda also shared in the day’s events.  Their generosity is most appreciated.  The inaugural recipient of the award is Revathi Kollipara, a senior chemistry major working in the laboratory of Marya Lieberman.

            The department also hosted a gathering of invited chemistry and biochemistry graduate student alumni before the Navy game in late October of 2011.  Fifteen alumni spanning the 1960’s through the 2000’s participated in a pilot focus group for the purpose of identifying ways in which the department can better engage its graduate alumni.  The impetus for this exercise was sourced in the recognition that the graduate experience at Notre Dame differs significantly from the undergraduate one and that graduate alumni probably have stronger ties to their graduating department than do undergraduates, whose allegiance tends to lie with the University as a whole.  Our department was selected for this exploratory study as it boasts one of the largest graduate populations in the University.  Results and a refined model of graduate alumni engagement will be shared with other departments.  If you have thoughts on how the department might better involve it’s former graduate students, please drop a note to Sean Kassen, academic advancement program director for the College of Science.

Notre Dame launches interdisciplinary Initiative on Race and Resilience

Notre Dame launches interdisciplinary Initiative on Race and Resilience

The University of Notre Dame has launched the Initiative on Race and Resilience, a new interdisciplinary program focused on the redress of systemic racism and the support of communities of color both within and beyond the Notre Dame campus. Led by the College of Arts & Letters with additional support...

Sustainability Career Series Opens Virtual Doors for Students

Sustainability Career Series Opens Virtual Doors for Students

With a record number of students enrolled in the Sustainability Minor and an increasing interest in careers incorporating sustainability, there was no question of canceling this semester's Environmental Career Trek. In light of the pandemic, the Sustainability Minor partnered with the Meruelo Center for Career Development to host a virtual...

I am ND: Meet Jon Camden

I am ND: Meet Jon Camden

Jon Camden first found his home at Notre Dame 25 years ago when he declared a chemistry major and signed up to take a credit course on playing the organ. 

His Passion Was Contagious

His Passion Was Contagious

Even as a young man, George Craig loved learning about mosquitoes. Over his lifetime he became a world-renowned entomologist whose dedication to fighting disease inspired a generation of scientists.

Climate change effects should be evaluated seasonally, 42-year study shows

Climate change effects should be evaluated seasonally, 42-year study shows

A 42-year study of bunchgrasses in Montana’s National Bison Range by researchers at the University of Notre Dame showed that several vegetation changes occurred seasonally, suggesting that studying climate change on a large-scale, annual basis may not be enough to fully understand and document its effects.

Online MS in Data Science students to take their skills to the movies

Online MS in Data Science students to take their skills to the movies

Students in the University of Notre Dame’s Online MS in Data Science program might be snacking on some buttered popcorn and candy in January, when their semi-annual immersion experience takes them to the movies. The movie business, that is — and specifically, the financial side of the operation.…

Majoring in sociology prepared Kiersten Hogan for medical school and a career in psychiatry — and gave her enough flexibility to add two minors in her senior year 

Majoring in sociology prepared Kiersten Hogan for medical school and a career in psychiatry — and gave her enough flexibility to add two minors in her senior year 

A single sociology class in her first year changed the course of Kiersten Hogan’s undergraduate career — and opened her eyes to the connections between social structures and health. The coronavirus pandemic confirmed for her the importance of providing mental health support and services, particularly for minority communities, and she added...

Similar pesticides show consistent effects on freshwater ecosystems

Similar pesticides show consistent effects on freshwater ecosystems

Hundreds of different chemicals exist for managing a variety of agricultural pests, but a new study from the University of Notre Dame showed that evaluating their effects on freshwater ecosystems could be streamlined if the compounds were evaluated in broad classes and types, rather than individually.