News

The department is delighted to announce the creation of the Nicholas C. Angelotti Undergraduate Research Fund in Analytical Chemistry. The fund, which will provide summer stipends for undergraduate researchers, was formally launched in April with a visit by the family of Nicholas Angelotti.  Included was a lecture by Nicholas’ son, Tim Angelotti, who graduated from Notre Dame in 1985 with a degree in chemistry and is currently an associate professor at the Stanford School of Medicine. The lecture, "Molecular Pharmacology: A biochemical analysis of receptor and ion channel function," described Tim’s work towards defining the molecular basis for receptor specificity with the goal of informing drug design.  Tim’s brother David, a 1985 Notre Dame graduate with a B.S. in engineering, followed the lecture with a few words about his father. Nicholas Angelotti graduated from Notre Dame in 1950 with a bachelor's degree in chemistry, earned a graduate degree at Case Institute of Technology and worked as an analytical chemist for 42 years at Dow Corning Corporation. In addition to Tim and David, Nicholas’ wife Mary Lou, son Steve, and daughter Linda also shared in the day’s events.  Their generosity is most appreciated.  The inaugural recipient of the award is Revathi Kollipara, a senior chemistry major working in the laboratory of Marya Lieberman.

            The department also hosted a gathering of invited chemistry and biochemistry graduate student alumni before the Navy game in late October of 2011.  Fifteen alumni spanning the 1960’s through the 2000’s participated in a pilot focus group for the purpose of identifying ways in which the department can better engage its graduate alumni.  The impetus for this exercise was sourced in the recognition that the graduate experience at Notre Dame differs significantly from the undergraduate one and that graduate alumni probably have stronger ties to their graduating department than do undergraduates, whose allegiance tends to lie with the University as a whole.  Our department was selected for this exploratory study as it boasts one of the largest graduate populations in the University.  Results and a refined model of graduate alumni engagement will be shared with other departments.  If you have thoughts on how the department might better involve it’s former graduate students, please drop a note to Sean Kassen, academic advancement program director for the College of Science.

Notre Dame licensee Hsiri Therapeutics enters into agreement for the treatment of mycobacterial diseases

Author: Nick Swisher

Dome And Reflection 250

University of Notre Dame licensee Hsiri Therapeutics, Inc., with its corporate headquarters located in Media, PA, has entered into a license agreement with Shionogi & Co., Ltd. regarding a collaborative licensing, research and development program to discover and develop novel therapeutics for non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) diseases and tuberculosis (TB).

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Juan Migliore bestowed with Shilts/Leonard Teaching Award

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Migliore 250

Juan Migliore, professor in the Department of Mathematics, is the recipient of the 2018 Father James L. Shilts, C.S.C./Doris and Gene Leonard Teaching Award in the College of Science. He was honored May 18 at the College of Science Dean’s Awards luncheon.

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Notre Dame in Chile: Exchanging ideas and creating pathways for collaboration

Author: Tammi Freehling

Group from Notre Dame Colleges of Science and Engineering in Chile with Catolica colleagues.

In April 2018, a delegation from Notre Dame visited with colleagues from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (Católica) in Santiago, Chile. The trip was led by Mary Galvin, William K. Warren Family Foundation Dean of the College of Science; and Peter Kilpatrick, Matthew H. McCloskey Dean of the College of Engineering, and included faculty and advisory council members. Galvin and Kilpatrick sought to engage in dialogue with peers, exchange ideas, and create pathways for collaboration between scientists and researchers at both institutions.

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Notre Dame researchers collaborate in discovery of potential stroke therapy

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Mayland Chang and Shahriar Mobashery

A study by researchers at the University of Notre Dame and the University of Missouri at Columbia shows in mice that early administration of a potent compound may increase the window of time in which some stroke patients can receive tPA, a therapeutic that dissolves blood clots.

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Designing a better superconductor

Author: Gene Stowe

Janko 250

Tiny tornadoes of supercurrent affect the way superconductors carry a current. But a magnet-controlled “switch” in superconductor configuration provides unprecedented flexibility in managing the location of vortex filaments, altering the properties of the superconductor. A new system discovered by Notre Dame physicist Boldizsár Jankó and collaborators will enable ongoing adjustments, altering the material’s properties over time.

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New Textbook Makes Study of Gas Discharges and Plasmas 
More Accessible to Students

Author: Nina Welding

David Go Portrait

Ionization and Ion Transport, the new textbook written by David B. Go, the Rooney Family Associate Professor of Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, and published by Morgan & Claypool, introduces engineering and science students to the basic concepts in physics and chemistry that form the foundation of plasma science and engineering — from gas dynamics and electron behavior to electrode processes and ion transport.

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