News

The department is delighted to announce the creation of the Nicholas C. Angelotti Undergraduate Research Fund in Analytical Chemistry. The fund, which will provide summer stipends for undergraduate researchers, was formally launched in April with a visit by the family of Nicholas Angelotti.  Included was a lecture by Nicholas’ son, Tim Angelotti, who graduated from Notre Dame in 1985 with a degree in chemistry and is currently an associate professor at the Stanford School of Medicine. The lecture, "Molecular Pharmacology: A biochemical analysis of receptor and ion channel function," described Tim’s work towards defining the molecular basis for receptor specificity with the goal of informing drug design.  Tim’s brother David, a 1985 Notre Dame graduate with a B.S. in engineering, followed the lecture with a few words about his father. Nicholas Angelotti graduated from Notre Dame in 1950 with a bachelor's degree in chemistry, earned a graduate degree at Case Institute of Technology and worked as an analytical chemist for 42 years at Dow Corning Corporation. In addition to Tim and David, Nicholas’ wife Mary Lou, son Steve, and daughter Linda also shared in the day’s events.  Their generosity is most appreciated.  The inaugural recipient of the award is Revathi Kollipara, a senior chemistry major working in the laboratory of Marya Lieberman.

            The department also hosted a gathering of invited chemistry and biochemistry graduate student alumni before the Navy game in late October of 2011.  Fifteen alumni spanning the 1960’s through the 2000’s participated in a pilot focus group for the purpose of identifying ways in which the department can better engage its graduate alumni.  The impetus for this exercise was sourced in the recognition that the graduate experience at Notre Dame differs significantly from the undergraduate one and that graduate alumni probably have stronger ties to their graduating department than do undergraduates, whose allegiance tends to lie with the University as a whole.  Our department was selected for this exploratory study as it boasts one of the largest graduate populations in the University.  Results and a refined model of graduate alumni engagement will be shared with other departments.  If you have thoughts on how the department might better involve it’s former graduate students, please drop a note to Sean Kassen, academic advancement program director for the College of Science.

Nuclear physics professor receives AAS Laboratory Astrophysics Prize

Author: Cliff Djajapranata

Michael Wiescher

Every year, the American Astronomical Society (AAS) Laboratory Astrophysics Division awards a prize to an individual who has made significant contributions to laboratory astrophysics over the course of his or her career. The 2018 award went to Michael Wiescher, the Freimann Professor of Physics. He was recognized for his significant contributions to the experimental foundation of nuclear astrophysics, as well as his research that closes the gap between experiment and theory in the field.     

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NDnano announces new center director

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Seabaugh 250

Alan Seabaugh, Frank M. Freimann Professor of Electrical Engineering, has been named the director of the University of Notre Dame’s Center for Nano Science and Technology (NDnano). As the new director, he will lead a center that supports more than seventy NDnano-affiliated faculty members from across nine departments in the Colleges of Engineering and Science to grow the scale and stature of the University’s nanotechnology research efforts.

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Notre Dame continues its commitment to sustainability

Author: Donnetta McClellan

Main Building

A key component of the University’s Comprehensive Sustainability Strategy includes reducing its carbon dioxide emissions in part through increasing its use of renewable and recoverable energy sources. A new energy plant, located in the small wooded area northeast of campus, will help do that.

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Physicist awarded $1.4M to continue work at CERN

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Mitch Wayne 250

University of Notre Dame physicist Mitchell Wayne was awarded $1.4 million for continued work on the Phase I upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN).

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Astrophysicist Beers collaborates on article about formation of heaviest elements in universe

Author: Deanna McCool

Timothybeers 250

Notre Dame Chair in Astrophysics Timothy C. Beers collaborated with Anna Frebel, associate professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, on a review article about the formation of the heaviest elements in the universe. The article, about the cosmic origins of the rapid neutron-capture process (the r-process), was published Jan. 2, 2018, in Physics Today.

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