News » Archives » 2008

Mosquito woes may follow Midwest floods

Author: William G. Gilroy

Mosquito.gif

As floodwaters recede in many areas of the Midwest, its residents most likely are breathing a sigh of relief. However, those same waters may have left behind residual problems in the form of an increase in mosquito-borne diseases and illnesses, according to Catherine Young, a biologist with the University of Notre Dames Eck Family Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases.

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New paper offers insights into "blinking"

Author: William G. Gilroy

Blinking

A new paper by a team of researchers led by University of Notre Dame physicist Bolizsár Jankó provides an overview of research into one of the few remaining unsolved problems of quantum mechanics.

More than a century ago, at the dawn of modern quantum mechanics, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Neils Bohr predicted so-called quantum jumps. He predicted that these jumps would be due to electrons making transitions between discrete energy levels of individual atoms and molecules. Although controversial in Bohr's time, such quantum jumps were experimentally observed, and his prediction verified, in the 1980s. More recently, with the development of single molecule imaging techniques in the early 1990s, it has been possible to observe similar jumps in individual molecules.

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Mobashery receives Astellas Award

Author: William G. Gilroy

shahriar_mobashery

Shahriar Mobashery, Navari Family Professor in Life Sciences at the University of Notre Dame, has been named the 2008 recipient of the Astellas USA Foundation Award by the American Chemical Society (ACS) for his work on antibiotic resistance and his important contributions to the understanding of the bacterial cell wall.

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Notre Dame hosts antibiotics conference

Author: Marissa Runkle

Antibiotic

Twenty-one leading researchers from universities and pharmaceuticals around the world will present at a conference titled, "Novel Antibiotics, Old and New Targets" on Saturday and Sunday (June 28 and 29) in the Jordan Hall of Science at the University of Notre Dame.

The conference assembles leaders from Pfizer, Merck, AstraZeneca, Wyeth-Ayerst, the University of Amsterdam, the University of Gent, the University of Ljubljana, Northwestern University, and numerous other institutions and pharmaceutical corporations who share an interest in developing antibacterial agents. Presenters will share their work on developments involving highly resistant bacteria, known assuperbugs, for which there are few, if any, treatments.

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Students Receive Summer Research Fellowships

Author: Marissa Gebhard

The College of Science has awarded thirteen Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF) to students who are conducting research on campus this summer. This selective fellowship award consists of a stipend of $4000 or more, and up to $500 for supplies. Each fellowship recipient is working full-time for 9– 10 weeks on a research project mentored by faculty in the College of Science. Support for SURF is provided by the College of Science, the Claire Booth Luce Scholars program,  …

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Algebraic geometry conference honors Sommese

Author: Gene Stowe

Sommese conference (2008)

Some 60 scholars from around the world attended a conference May 22-24 titled “Interactions of Classical and Numerical Algebraic Geometry” in honor of the 60th birthday of Andrew Sommese. Sommese, director of the Center for Applied Mathematics and Duncan Professor of Mathematics, was a central figure in classical algebraic geometry before he turned his attention to numerical algebraic geometry in the mid-1990s and became a leader in that field.

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Astronomers find tiny planet orbiting tiny star

Author: William G. Gilroy

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An international team of astronomers led by David Bennett of the University of Notre Dame has discovered an extra-solar planet of about three Earth masses orbiting a star with a mass so low that its core may not be large enough to maintain nuclear reactions. The result was presented Monday (June 2) at the American Astronomical Society annual meeting in St. Louis.

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Seth Brown receives Shilts/Leonard Teaching Award

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Seth Brown

The College of Science has chosen Seth Brown, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, as the recipient of the Shilts/Leonard Teaching Award. The award, which was conferred on May 16 at the College of Science awards luncheon, is presented for excellence in undergraduate or graduate teaching.

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Two seniors receive 2008 Dean's Award

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Adam Boocher

Adam Gadzinski

Two outstanding University of Notre Dame seniors, Adam Boocher and Adam Gadzinski, received the 2008 College of Science Dean’s Award at the college awards luncheon on May 16.  College of Science faculty congratulate both of these exemplary students.

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College of Science faculty receive SAPC funding

Author: Marissa Gebhard

The University’s Strategic Academic Planning Committee (SAPC) identified a total of five research projects which will receive a total of up to $40 million for the first phase of integrated research initiatives. Two of the five proposals were awarded to College of Science faculty.

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Two Mathematics Majors Win Goldwater Scholarships

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Goldwater Winners

Junior Andrew Manion and sophomore Eric Riedl have each been awarded Barry M. Goldwater scholarships for the 2008-09 academic year. Both Manion and Riedl are double majors in mathematics and music who plan to pursue doctorates in mathematics and careers in teaching and research after graduating from Notre Dame.

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Physics sophomore wins Department of Defense scholarship

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Kristina Sault

University of Notre Dame sophomore Kristina Sault has won a U.S. Department of Defense scholarship that will pay full tuition, fees, books and a stipend for the next two years of her undergraduate education. Sault is a physics major from Hawaii.

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Over 70 students present research results at COS-JAM

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Alec Hirschauer

The second College of Science Joint Annual Meeting (COS-JAM) on May 2 brought more than 70 students, almost twice as many as last year, to present their undergraduate research, along with faculty and fellow students who filled lecture halls and classrooms and crowded the poster-lined Jordan Hall of Science Galleria. The event was part of the University of Notre Dame Undergraduate Scholars Conference.

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Biology graduate named Shaheen Award winner

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Jake Beaulieu (2008)

Jake Beaulieu, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Biological Sciences, received one of four 2008 Eli J. and Helen Shaheen Graduate School Award at the University’s  commencement ceremony on May 17. The award recognizes the top graduating doctoral degree recipients across the University.

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Notre Dame: Rising above the gathering storm changing the face of physics and physicists

Author: Gene Stowe

Leaders of industry, academics, and members of the national science academies are all concerned about the next generation of scientists and engineers to take on the challenges of the 21st century. One approach to addressing the upcoming shortages of scientists and engineers and to enhance our competitive edge in the flat globalization world is to increase the presence of under-represented minorities in the physical sciences

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College of Science faculty receive Dockweiler and Joyce Awards

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Paul Grimstad, associate professor of biological sciences, has been selected to receive the Dockweiler Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising. The award recognizes faculty and staff who have demonstrated a sustained commitment to Notre Dame undergraduates through outstanding mentoring, academic advising or career counseling services. Grimstad was one of only three recipients.

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Notre Dame medical alumni supporting medical missions

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Last summer, 15 students and alumni who received partial funding from Notre Dame medical alumni for medical missions traveled to sites such as the Maryknoll Missions in Cambodia, Common Hope in Guatemala, The Timmy Foundation in Ecuador, the Foundation for Peace in the Dominican Republic, and the Institute for Internal Medicine in Africa.

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Distinguished alumna lecture is like a “mini course in medicinal chemistry"

Author: Gene Stowe

Ann Weber

Ann Weber, executive director of medicinal chemistry at Merck Research Laboratories, described the design and synthesis of Januvia™ (generic: sitagliptin), a new treatment for type 2 diabetes at a lecture last Thursday (April 10)  in Nieuwland as part of the Organic Seminar series sponsored by the Department of Chemistry.

Weber, who was Notre Dame’s 1982 valedictorian, graduated with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry and  later earned a Ph.D. in organic chemistry at Harvard University. Marvin Miller, the George and Winifred Clark Chair in Chemistry, called the talk “a mini course in medicinal chemistry.”

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Distinguished career of Walter Johnson

Author: Gene Stowe

walter_johnson

Early in his career at the University of Notre Dame, around 1960, Walter Johnson took students at night to Bendix Corp. to do calculations on the manufacturer’s computer that could do 15 multiplications a second–15 times as many as the University’s computer.

“When they weren’t using their computer, they let us use it,” recalled Johnson, an atomic physicist. “The emphasis was to try to do things that people normally would do with pencil and paper, but you can’t get far that way. That’s been kind of the story of my research. During the time I’ve been working in this area, there has been this incredible development of computers.”

Johnson, 79, has been a world leader in the use of computers to solve complex problems, bringing the technology together with mathematics and physics. Leading physicists gathered at Notre Dame from around the world April 4-5 to toast his half-century with a symposium on atomic physics.

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Rhodes Scholar Andrew Serazin ’03 addresses global health inequities

Author: Gene Stowe

Andrew Serazin

Biology alumnus Andrew Serazin, who was the University’s fourteenth Rhodes Scholar, was the guest speaker at the Distinguished Alumni Lecture Series for the Department of Biological Sciences on March 25. As a Program Officer for the Gates Foundation, Serazin spoke on “Innovation in Science and Technology: A critical path to addressing global health inequities.”

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Freshman science major Kurt Nowak wins Biolojog

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Kurt Nowak

Kurt Nowak, a science intent from Arizona, has been running since the age of thirteen. His dedication to running paid off this past Saturday, March 15 when he became the first place winner for the 2008 Biology club fundraiser, “Biolojog.” The event, which raised money for spaying and neutering animals in Saint Joseph County, included both a 2 mile competitive race and a 1 mile fun walk.

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American Physical Society recognizes Cason, Furdyna, and Johnson for lifetime award

Author: Marissa Gebhard

APS Award

Physics professors Jacek Furdyna, Walter Johnson and emeritus physics professor Neal Cason were selected by the American Physical Society to receive the inaugural Outstanding Referee Award on March 10, 2008. This highly selective, lifetime award recognizes scientists who have been exceptionally helpful in assessing manuscripts for publication in APS journals including Physical Review Letters, Physical Review and Modern Physics.

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Trozzolo wins the 2008 UNICO National Marconi Science Award

Author: Marissa Gebhard

tony_trozzolo

Anthony Trozzolo, the Charles L. Huisking Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, was presented with the 2008 UNICO National Marconi Science Award in Chicago on March 8. Trozzolo is a prolific inventor with over 31 U.S. and foreign patents. A world-renowned authority on photochemistry, Trozzolo has focused his lifelong research efforts on the creation and detection of reactive intermediates. The chemical compounds and elements that he creates, detects and analyzes with spectroscopy, laser spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy are reactive or sensitive to energy from light.

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Notre Dame study sheds light on the role streams and rivers play in nitrogen removal

Author: William G. Gilroy

Jennifer Tank

Jennifer Tank, Galla Associate Professor of Ecology at the University of Notre Dame, is one of the authors of a new study that concludes that streams and rivers can serve as essential filters that reduce the amount of nitrate pollution that is exported from the landscape to downstream lakes and coastal marine systems.

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Science and Engineering Fair scheduled for Saturday

Author: William G. Gilroy

NIRSEF

The Northern Indiana Regional Science and Engineering Fair will take place Saturday (March 15) at the University of Notre Dame's Stepan Center. The event is open to the public at 1:30 p.m. and parking is available in the D lots east of the Stepan Center or in the Library B lot.

The fair will feature 210 projects created by students in grades four through 12 from public and private schools in St. Joseph, Elkhart, Fulton and Marshall counties.

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Brown University researcher appointed College of Science dean

Author: William G. Gilroy

Dean Gregory Crawford (2008)

Gregory P. Crawford, currently dean of engineering and professor of physics and engineering at Brown University, has been appointed dean of the College of Science at the University of Notre Dame by Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., the University's president.

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Kuno publishes nanowire results

Author: Gene Stowe

ken_kuno

Ken Kuno, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry, recently published his results on spatial and intensity modulation of nanowire emission in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

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Preprofessional students explore humanistic medicine

Author: Gene Stowe

Pathos Class

Through a one-credit elective course called “Pathos,” preprofessional students are exploring the practice of person-centered healthcare. After completing selected readings on particular healthcare topics, students listen and interact with a guest speaker who is typically a physician with expertise on the discussion topic.

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Physics researcher reports novel interaction between superconductivity and magnetism

Author: William G. Gilroy

An international collaboration of researchers led by Morten Ring Eskildsen, an assistant professor of physics at the University of Notre Dame, has discovered an altogether new way in which superconducting electrons can interact with an applied magnetic field.

Superconductivity is a phenomenon which occurs in certain materials and which manifests itself by a complete loss of electrical resistance. An important area in the study of superconductors is how they respond to magnetic fields. Besides their obvious relevance to practical applications, such studies are an ideal way to obtain a deeper understanding of the fundamental aspects of superconductivity.

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Biological sciences professor Paul Weinstein dies at age 88

Author: William G. Gilroy

Paul P. Weinstein, professor emeritus of biological sciences at the University of Notre Dame, died Jan. 5 in South Bend's St. Joseph Regional Medical Center. He was 88.

A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., he earned his bachelors degree from Brooklyn College in 1941 and his doctorate from Johns Hopkins University in 1949.

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