Upcoming Events

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Burgers with the Faculty

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Location: Five Guys Burgers and Fries, Eddy Street Commons

The Notre Dame Biology Club is raising money for the Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB), a national eye research organization that has raised over $450 million for research on the development of treatments and cures for those affected by retinal degenerative diseases.

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Talk Science

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Location: Jordan Hall Reading Room

Talk Science seminar

Don't miss the first Talk Science seminar of the academic year!

Junior biology major Michael Dinh will be presenting his neuroscience research titled, "A Story of the Senses: Olfactory Modulation of the Auditory Cortex." Professor Kenjiro Gomes of the Department of Physics will be giving a talk on his condensed matter research in a presentation titled, "Redesigning the Electron with Atomic Manipulation."

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Saturday, September 20, 2014

Domer Doggy Walk

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Location: Irish Green (Intersection of Eddy St. & Angela Blvd.)

Registration starts at noon; walk starts at 1 p.m. Activities and contests run from noon to 3 p.m. on Irish Green.

Proceeds benefit the St. Joseph County Spay Neuter Assistance Program (SJC-SNAP).

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Sunday, September 21, 2014

5th Annual Notre Dame VisionWalk

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Location: University of Notre Dame

The Notre Dame Biology Club will host the 5th Annual Notre Dame VisionWalk on September 21. The VisionWalk is a national signature fundraising event for the Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB), a national eye research organization that has raised over $450 million for research on the development of treatments and cures for those affected by retinal degenerative diseases.

Information about the event is available at on the event's Facebook page.

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Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Biological Sciences Seminar: “Tumor cell survival during detachment from the extracellular matrix: The Achilles’ heel of the cancer metastasis?”

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Location: 283 Galvin Life Science

Zach Schafer

The Department of Biological Sciences is pleased to present a seminar by Zachary T. Schafer, Coleman Assistant Professor of Cancer Biology at the University of Notre Dame. The talk, “Tumor cell survival during detachment from the extracellular matrix: The Achilles’ heel of the cancer metastasis?” will take place on Tuesday, September 23 at 4pm in 283 Galvin Life Science.

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Thursday, September 25, 2014

Flipping Technical Classrooms with MOOCs

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Location: 126 DeBartolo Hall

The Office of Digital Learning and the College of Engineering invite you to attend Prof. Todd Murphey's guest lecture on “Flipping Technical Classrooms with MOOCs”. In this talk, Murphey will discuss the experience of delivering a successful Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), "Everything Is the Same: Modeling Engineered Systems", on the Coursera platform. This talk will be of interest to anyone interested in online, flipped, or blended  teaching and learning. All are welcome.

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Saturday, October 4, 2014

Science Exploration Series: "From the Sun above to the Supercollider Underground: How studying the smallest things teaches us about the largest (DVT Presentation)"

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Location: Digital Visualization Theater, 100 Jordan Hall of Science

dvt250

Make science part of your game day schedule, and join the College of Science for exciting presentations before Notre Dame home football games.

The answers from machines such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva teach us about the basic building blocks of matter, but the realms of energies it studies don't happen anywhere else on Earth.  Dr. Davis will use the Digital Visualization Theater to show the audience how the LHC gathers answers about the nature of matter, and how that greater understanding applies to various targets within the universe and the big bang itself.

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Thursday, October 9, 2014

Charles Edison Lecture: "The Protein Folding Problem"

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Location: 127 Hayes-Healy Center

Peter Wolynes, Charles Edison Lecture

Protein folding can be understood as a biased search on a funneled but rugged energy landscape. The funneled nature of the protein energy landscape is a consequence of natural selection. Prof. Peter Wolynes of Rice University will discuss how this rather simple picture quantitatively predicts folding mechanism from native structure and sequence. He will also discuss recent advances using energy landscape ideas to create algorithms capable of predicting protein tertiary structure from sequence, protein binding sites and the nature of structurally specific protein misfolding relevant to disease. Finally, he will compare the physical folding energy landscape with the apparent fitness landscape of evolution as inferred from large genomic data sets.

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Saturday, October 11, 2014

Science Exploration Series: "Harper Cancer Research Institute: Changing the Way We Fight Cancer"

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Location: 101 Jordan Hall of Science

Harper Cancer Research Institute

Despite considerable scientific advances, cancer claims millions of our family and friends every year.  Breakthrough-level discoveries require an innovative approach to increase cancer survival.  Learn how unique collaborative teams at the Harper Cancer Research Institute combine the power of biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics, medicine and physics to change the way we fight cancer.

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Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Monday, October 27, 2014

Saturday, November 15, 2014

Science Exploration Series: "New Developments in Fighting Tuberculosis"

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Location: 101 Jordan Hall of Science

Jeff Schorey

Tuberculosis (TB) takes the lives of approximately 1.4 million people per year. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria responsible for TB, is the leading cause of death by a bacterial pathogen. This presentation will discuss why this pathogen is so deadly and what approaches Notre Dame researchers are using to develop better vaccines and diagnostics to combat TB.

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Saturday, November 22, 2014

Science Exploration Series: "Radioactivity in the Environment: What's the Risk?"

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Location: 101 Jordan Hall of Science

Amy Hixon

Uranium and thorium are naturally-occurring radioactive elements that are widely distributed among rocks and minerals.  However, most actinide elements are present in the environment as a result of nuclear weapons production and testing, nuclear fuel disposition, and nuclear fuel cycle accidents (e.g., Chermobyl, Fukushima Daiichi).  These actinide elements pose a long-term environmental concern due to their toxicity and long half-lives.  In this talk, Professor Hixon will discuss what the Environmental Radiochemistry group is doing to understand and predict actinide mobility in the environment.

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Monday, April 13, 2015