News

Understanding the culture behind cell cultures

Author: Jenna Bilinski

Orrin Belden

The immune system plays an important part in the formation and progression of cancer cells. Orrin Belden, a senior science preprofessional major, has spent his past two years better understanding and contributing to the field of immunology. Orrin works for Brian Baker, professor of chemistry and biochemistry, whose lab focuses on developing immunological therapies for cancer based on cellular immunity.

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Father Theodore Hesburgh of Notre Dame dies at age 97

Author: Dennis Brown

Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., saying Mass

Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., president of the University of Notre Dame from 1952 to 1987, a priest of the Congregation of Holy Cross and one of the nation’s most influential figures in higher education, the Catholic Church and national and international affairs, died at 11:30 p.m. Thursday (Feb. 26) at Holy Cross House adjacent to the University. He was 97.

“We mourn today a great man and faithful priest who transformed the University of Notre Dame and touched the lives of many,” said Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., Notre Dame’s president. “With his leadership, charisma and vision, he turned a relatively small Catholic college known for football into one of the nation’s great institutions for higher learning."

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Investigating aggressive, lethal breast tumors of Kenyan cancer patients

Author: Stephanie Healey

Maggie Kerper

Maggie Kerper came to college interested in science, but really developed a passion for the field after taking her first college-level science classes. After transferring to Notre Dame as a sophomore, she decided to find ways to explore science outside of the classroom.   

Kerper began working with Laurie Littlepage, Campbell Assistant Professor of Cancer Research in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, during the spring of her sophomore year. “I went to an extra credit talk given by Prof. Littlepage and was so impressed and interested in her work. I had no idea cancer research opportunities like this existed on campus,” she explains. “I immediately felt drawn to get involved. I can’t think of any other field that I would feel the sort of gratification and drive to work harder than the cancer field.”

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Chemistry in motion

Author: Michael Rodio

Amanda Hummon

To say that Amanda Hummon is busy these days—even by Notre Dame standards of busy—would be an understatement. She insists otherwise, of course. But consider this: In addition to teaching classes to Notre Dame undergraduates, Hummon is guiding no less than four major research projects this academic year on varying aspects of cancer research.

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Math for Everyone explores Newton's method

Author: Shadia Ajam

Math for Everyone Series

This past Thursday (Feb. 19) at the Math for Everyone lecture series, Jeffrey Diller, professor of mathematics at the University of Notre Dame, gave a presentation about imaginary numbers, unsolvable equations, and Newton’s method.

Diller opened his presentation by posing the question of what mathematicians do, one of which is to solve equations. He then delved into equations that are unsolvable, like non-linear equations. “When we can’t solve equations, we need methods to approximate solutions to equations,” said Diller.

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Scientia hosts first Talk Science: Innovation Series of the semester

Author: Shadia Ajam

chang_hsueh_chia250

The students from Scientia, the undergraduate journal of scientific research, host a monthly seminar series called Talk Science that highlights the work of undergraduate and faculty researchers at the University. This semester, Talk Science will focus on research that can be applied in innovative ways. This month’s presenters were junior biological sciences major Vincent Riccelli and Hsueh-Chia Chang, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering. 

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