Upcoming Events

Tuesday, December 10, 2019

Departmental Seminar: Elise Zipkin

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Location: 283 Galvin Life Science Center

Elise Zipkin, Assistant Professor, Department of Integrative Biology at Michigan State University will give a seminar entitled "Developing integrated models for biological conservation: a case study with monarch butterflies" on Tuesday, December 10 at 4:00 p.m. in 283 Galvin.

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Wednesday, December 11, 2019

Friday, December 13, 2019

BGSO Wellness Workshop: Setting Your Compass

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Location: 115B Galvin Life Science Center

Who and what is important to you? Who do you want to be? How much are these present and guiding your life? In Setting Your Compass, participants will learn how meaning and purpose impact their well-being, how awareness of personal values increases happiness and reduces stress and how reorienting their priorities can re-energize their lives. Dr. Megan Brown will take participants on an experiential journey to reconnect with their values, learn the most effective psychological intervention for promoting resilience, and practice a technique that cultivates a mindful and values-centered life. This event is hosted by the Biology Graduate Student Organization and the McDonald Center for Student Well-Being. Coffee and snacks will be provided!…

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Sunday, December 15, 2019

Monday, December 16, 2019

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Thursday, January 16, 2020

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Educating the Whole Physician Lecture Series: "The Messiness of the Moral of Interspecies Encounters in Medical Lab Research"

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Location: TBA

Dr. Lesley A. Sharp, B. Chamberlain & H. Chamberlain Josefsberg ’30 Chair in Anthropology, Barnard College and Senior Research Scientist in Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

Abstract: Lab research is guided by a host of standardized, ethical standards that shape quotidian practices of animal welfare and care while, oddly, obscuring, erasing, or denying human efforts at self-care. An attentiveness to the “messiness of the moral” uncovers the complexities of interspecies encounters in science, offering, in turn, possibilities for the (re)making of the researcher, and, thus, of the “whole physician" in and outside the lab.…

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Wednesday, February 5, 2020

Friday, February 7, 2020

John Ruskin: Prophet of the Anthropocene

Location:

Ruskin

On February 8, 2019, the 200th anniversary of John Ruskin’s birth, the BBC published a feature asking “Was John Ruskin the most important man of the last 200 years?” The question is entirely warranted. John Ruskin, Victorian art critic turned social commentator, was an early analyst of the damage done to the earth by industrialization, and placed questions of beauty at the heart of all his writings on science, architecture, urban environments, painting, economics, education, and what we now call ecology. Deeply trained in scripture by his evangelical parents and in classics by his education at Oxford, Ruskin was a champion of the most innovative British painters of the nineteenth century, an activist deeply committed to the education of the working class, and a utopianist, whose plan for a Guild of St. George tried to model a community that would honor both the earth’s and the human worker’s need for connection and replenishment. Leaving behind an enormous body of writing, Ruskin continues to influence art history, architecture, literary studies, political theory, ethics, environmental studies, and schooling. This conference, convening on the weekend of his 201st birthday, will explore how his legacy continues to challenge the disciplinary divides that separate art from science and ethics from economics; and how his critique of Victorian capitalism and industrialization can address our own concerns today.…

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Saturday, February 8, 2020

John Ruskin: Prophet of the Anthropocene

Location:

Ruskin

On February 8, 2019, the 200th anniversary of John Ruskin’s birth, the BBC published a feature asking “Was John Ruskin the most important man of the last 200 years?” The question is entirely warranted. John Ruskin, Victorian art critic turned social commentator, was an early analyst of the damage done to the earth by industrialization, and placed questions of beauty at the heart of all his writings on science, architecture, urban environments, painting, economics, education, and what we now call ecology. Deeply trained in scripture by his evangelical parents and in classics by his education at Oxford, Ruskin was a champion of the most innovative British painters of the nineteenth century, an activist deeply committed to the education of the working class, and a utopianist, whose plan for a Guild of St. George tried to model a community that would honor both the earth’s and the human worker’s need for connection and replenishment. Leaving behind an enormous body of writing, Ruskin continues to influence art history, architecture, literary studies, political theory, ethics, environmental studies, and schooling. This conference, convening on the weekend of his 201st birthday, will explore how his legacy continues to challenge the disciplinary divides that separate art from science and ethics from economics; and how his critique of Victorian capitalism and industrialization can address our own concerns today.…

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2020 Notre Dame Global Health Case Competition

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Location: Mediation Room, Jenkins Nanovic Halls

In this competition, undergraduate and graduate students collaborate to develop a practical solution to a real-world global health challenge. Students are given an innovative learning experience that trains future global health leaders. Learn more

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Monday, March 30, 2020

Wednesday, April 15, 2020

Monday, April 20, 2020